Need Some Inspiration? Part II

inspiration part 2The Career Services staff at Daytona Beach wanted to have a part two to a blog from in August.   There are so many quotes that can continue to motivate through a co-op/internship and/or job search.  Here are more of the staff’s favorite inspirational quotes.  Feel free to read part one here.

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” ―Eleanor Roosevelt

“Don’t be afraid to fail. Don’t waste energy trying to cover up failure. Learn from your failures and go on to the next challenge. It’s OK to fail. If you’re not failing, you’re not growing.” –H. Stanley Judd

“One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.” –Arthur Ashe

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.”–Wayne Gretzky

“Enter every activity without giving mental recognition to the possibility of defeat. Concentrate on your strengths, instead of your weaknesses… on your powers, instead of your problems.” -Paul J. Meyer

 “Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, magic, and power in it.” -Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

 “Limitations live only in our minds.  But if we use our imaginations, our possibilities become limitless” –Jamie Paolinetti

“When one door of happiness closes, another opens, but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one that has been opened for us” –Helen Keller

“A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.” -Albert Einstein

“You have to learn the rules of the game.  And then you have to play better than anyone else.” -Albert Einstein

“If opportunity doesn’t Knock, build a door” –Milton Birle

“The greatest accomplishment is not in never falling, but in rising after you fall” –Vince Lambardi

Co-op/Intern Spotlight: Mark Payne

Mark PayneMark Payne is an Aerospace Engineering student at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach.  He transferred to Riddle in spring 2014 in order to study Aerospace Engineering.  Although he is fascinated by planes, the reality is that he grew up in a ship yard.  His father owns San Juan Towing & Marine Services, which specialized in commercial vessel repair and small scale towing.

How did you land the internship and how did you navigate the process?

Landing an internship for the summer was nearly impossible. The reality was that my GPA was just below the required GPA for most employers and I would usually be cut off because of that. After several months of constantly applying to most major companies, and calling many smaller companies, I had not heard any responses.

By late April, I was worried for obvious reasons. The idea of applying to as many as thirty internships and not even landing one interview was not very motivating. My father actually mentioned the fact that I should diversify. That is when I decided to look for a company which was not related to the aerospace industry. I found the International Ship Repair & Marine Services in Tampa. In order to “land the internship”, I scheduled a meeting with the company Vice President two days after finals had finished and was working the very next Monday.

What experience have you had and what did you do on your internship?

My experience was definitely unique. I had the opportunity to be rotated between three different departments. These were the machinist department, the quality assurance department, and the estimating department.

As a machinist, I was out in the field with the workers. I was able to obtain real exposure and got hands on shipyard experience. I was also able to learn how to use manufacturing equipment such as lathes and milling machines.

While working in the quality assurance department I was responsible for the visual inspection of drive shafts and propeller blades that were both coming in and out of the machine shop.

Working with the estimating department was my favorite. I was given the tasks of designing engine mounts for three ton diesel engines and a propeller stand which could hold a five ton propeller.

What advice would you give students who are contemplating doing an internship experience?

I would tell students to pursue any and every opportunity possible. Not only will they gain valuable experience which will make them better engineers and more hire able, but they will also, in most cases, be able to obtain engineering tech elective credit in an engineering student.

Talk about your learning experience both professionally and personally.

While interning, although my schedule varied, I was working 40 hours per week. While working with the machinist and job estimating departments, I had a 7:25AM to 3:55PM work schedule. While working for the quality assurance department, I was working by 6:00 and out by 2:30PM. I had a 1/2 lunch break.

Besides interning, I was also taking two of ERAU’s online classes. I was able to both work full time and take two classes. This was definitely a very big plus.

Would you do a second internship? Why? 

I have already begun applying for many internships. I believe that while one internship is definitely necessary, having two internships is even better.

What are the benefits you will take away from doing the internship when looking for a full-time career?

When looking for a full time career I will have the benefit of having prior work experience. This is extremely valuable in a very competitive job market. Having prior work experience is a very big plus.

Any other general advice to share?

As for advice, I have to emphasize that there is nothing more important than constantly applying to internships. If you’ve applied for twenty positions and think that you are done, think again and apply for twenty more. In my case, I was able to land an internship on my last attempt.

If you are unable to land an internship because of grades, take summer courses, either on campus or online. By doing so, you will improve your GPA and have a better chance of being hired when applying for future internships.

 

 

 

 

 

Ten Ways Job-Seekers Bomb Job Interviews

Dr. Randall Hansen posted a great article on the Quintessential Careers Blog in regards to various ways job-seeks can bomb job interviews.Quint Careers

Below is the article:

10 Ways to Bomb Your Job Interview

1. Late to the interview. Repeat this mantra: I will ALWAYS be on time for job interviews. There’s no excuse for being late to an interview, and even if by some amazing chance the employer finds the time to interview, you have dug a hole that very few job-seekers ever recover from. Plan ahead, take a test run, and leave early enough for contingencies (accident, road construction, weather). And if it’s a Webcam, Skype, Google Hangout interview, there is NO excuse for not being online for the start of the interview.

2. Bad attire/grooming. I will never forget the time a graduating college student arrived to an interview dressed in a beautiful and expensive suit, crisp white shirt, and power tie… until he got closer and we saw he was wearing sandals. The rest of the interview, the interviewer kept dropping snarky sandal comments; the interview was over before it started. You should ALWAYS dress the part and be well-groomed — even for Webcam interviews.

3. Limited eye contact. Making eye contact is a sign of confidence — and employers want to hire confident job-seekers. Don’t start at the interviewer, but practice making frequent eye contact. In a panel interview, make eye contact with every person. If you have a hard time looking directly into someone else’s eyes, focus on looking at the bridge of each person’s nose.

4. Weak knowledge of employer. Nothing turns off an employer faster than a job applicant who appears to know little of the organization — or the job itself. One of the most important things you should do upon obtaining an interview is to research the employer — both for your own knowledge, but also so you can speak intelligently of the organization — as well as ask intelligent questions.

5. Bland, weak, or boring interview responses. Find the middle ground between providing too little detail — and not providing enough. Your interview responses should be crisp, short, and to-the-point. Know your accomplishments and practice answering typical job interview questions. If you are relatively inexperienced (or it’s been a long time since you have been on an interview), conduct at least one mock interview.

6. Lack of enthusiasm. Do not interview when you’re tired — and do not overcompensate with one too many energy drinks. Try and maintain a strong, but not over-the-top energy level throughout the interview so that the employer knows you are definitely interested in the job.

7. Appearing desperate. Even if you NEED the job, if you appear too eager, too willing, too desperate, many employers will see this as a weakness — just as they see someone who is currently unemployed as a weakness. Express your interest in the job, but don’t cross the line.

8. Willing to take any job. You MUST know the job you seek — and then SHOW the employer why you are qualified for it. If you appear unfocused — or willing to take any job “just so you can work for such a great employer” — you will likely NOT be asked back for another interview. Employers hire job specialists these days.

9. Complaining about past jobs/bosses. Never — NEVER — talk negatively about an employer or manager… even if you hate your current (or last) job, you MUST put a positive spin on it. Focus on yourself, not the negatives of the job.

10. Failing to ask questions. We actually had a job-seeker recently tell us that she thought it was rude to ask questions in a job interview! Quite the opposite. Many hiring managers will make the assumption you do not really care about the job if you don’t ask questions in the interview. But do NOT ask obvious questions you could have learned from doing the proper research. And — if not discussed in the interview — your last question should always be about the next steps in the hiring process.

 

To read the full article, please visit the Quintessential Careers Blog: http://blog.quintcareers.com/ways-job-seekers-bomb-job-interviews/

 

Alumni Spotlight: Kevin MacLean

Kevin McLeanKevin MacLean is a May 2001 graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach.  He completed his Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Science and is currently a helicopter pilot for NextEra Energy.

What does your current role with NextEra Energy entail? 

Since 2006, I have been flying helicopters and jets for an outfit in Palm Beach, Florida called NextEra Energy. This Part 91 flight department has 2 Agusta helicopters, 2 Citation XLs, 2 Falcon 2000s, and 11 pilots.  The helicopters usually fly all over Florida and into the Keys, while the jets cover the entire North America, Caribbean and occasionally Europe.

Landing at a flight department like this was a career goal of mine. I fly the line and am also a Training Captain on the helicopters.I assist with new hire, recurrent, and instrument training. Interestingly enough, my dad is actually the one who first told me about NextEra’s flight department, having been and  engineer working with the company for over 40 years.

How did you make the initial transition from fixed wing to rotor?

My transition from fixed-wing to helicopters occurred six months after starting my initial fixed-wing flight training. Thankfully, my comrade Hugh, connected me with his good friend Josh, who was chief pilot for a helicopter company at KFXE in South Florida. Josh recruited me as an intern, where I quickly earned my helicopter ratings. In the year 2000, I was an ERAU student with a helicopter in Daytona. This served as my time-building flying job senior year and beyond graduation.

Based on your experience, what are the advantages of working in corporate aviation?

In my experience, corporate aviation is a real blessing. Each outfit I have had the pleasure to fly with has been like a small family with a very personal feel. It usually is a fairly low stress environment. Corporate aviation’s goal is to be safe, flexible, convenient, and comfortable. We often have very sophisticated equipment and there also tends to be a variety of destinations.

What personal attributes do you feel help to make one successful in the corporate aviation environment?

A good attribute for success in corporate aviation is flexibility. These groups are small, relying on the limited staff to do a variety of tasks.  A positive attitude goes a very long way. The flight crew is faced with new challenges best handled by the problem-solving personalities. Another valuable tool is the ability to work well with others, because everyone wants to be around quality people.
What advice do you have for current and future pilots seeking work in corporate aviation?

Emphasis on networking is huge advice for pilots seeking work in corporate aviation. Networking starts in flight school and continues beyond the time you actually find the job you are looking for. I personally have flown for over a half-dozen different corporate outfits, and each one of these opportunities became real due to networking. Stay in contact with your peers, and make new contacts: classmates, coworkers, social media, job fairs, internet research, and other methods.  Remain professional as you network and prepare for a flood of success.

Ways to Be Eligible for a Salary Increase

Raise$By: Valerie Kielmovitch

After putting in time at a job, sometimes people become interested in the next step or being able to earn more for their work. Though every industry, company, and/or job may have a different method for administering salary increases to employees, but here are some general ways to ensure that you are a viable candidate earning a raise:

  • Stand out from the crowd
    • This can be demonstrated by doing outstanding work, volunteering when needed, and/or creating a strong reputation for yourself among the company and/or team. Office gossip happens in many workplaces, but try to not contribute to this in order to create a positive image of yourself.
  • Step up to the plate
    • Try to take on leadership roles within your team and/or office. This could include training a new employee, organizing professional development opportunities or volunteer experiences, or demonstrating expertise on a project/assignment.
  • Create a strong case
    • When approaching a supervisor, make sure you have solid reasons for justifying your potential raise. Think about what accomplishments you have made, if this is the right time to be asking (e.g. end of year evaluations, at a career milestone, or after a profitable quarter), and do not ask for an exorbitant amount.
  • Involve your performance review
    • It may be a good idea to have the raise discussion around the time of your performance review as this gives you an advantage (if it is positive) as for reasons why a raise is justifiable.
  • Always end in a question
    • Asking questions and listening during the conversation with your supervisor would be advantageous to the discussion being productive. You do not want to go into a conversation demanding more money as typically you will not get the outcome you are seeking.

Valerie Kielmovitch was recently promoted to Associate Director and Employer Relations Manager within the Career Services Office at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University- Daytona Beach. She has worked in the Career Services office at ERAU since 2010. She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Central Florida and her Master of Education specializing in Higher Education and Student Affairs at the University of South Carolina. Valerie has a diverse background in the field of higher education from residence life to career services.

 

Graduating Student Success Story: Krystel Parra

Krystel Parra is a recent graduate of the Aerospace & Occupational Safety undergraduate degree program at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), Daytona Beach campus. She is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Occupational Safety Management at ERAU, Worldwide. Krystel also works full time as an Internal Evaluation Program Auditor in Spirit Airlines’ Safety Department.

KrystelBelow is a brief description of Krystel’s current position at Spirit Airlines and how her ERAU education helped her obtain this role:

As an IEP Auditor, I am part of the Internal Evaluation Program (IEP) in Spirit Airlines.

We provide a high level surveillance and evaluation of how well the company’s processes and procedures are performing in respect to safety. I work with Spirit’s business partners and Team Members in all types of operational departments to ensure that our customers get from point A to point B as safely as possible by performing evaluations, risk assessments, and providing corrective actions to the operational parties.

My Bachelor of Science in Aerospace and Occupational Safety degree gave me the tools that are required in the safety profession. While in Spirit’s Safety Department, I use what I learned in the classroom and apply it to the workplace. For example, when performing evaluations of workplace conditions, my knowledge of federal regulations learned from classes such as Environmental Compliance & Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and System Safety provide me the tools I need to successfully perform my duties as an IEP Auditor.

Identifying companies that will be the right fit for you!

By: Sally Richards

Spend some quality time using a variety of resources searching for companies and researching those companies forsearch companies potential career employment. It is important to determine which company is right for you and if you are right for that company. Searching and researching go hand in hand.

You may already have a group of companies you are familiar with that you think are your targeted companies…but what about the other thousands of companies, contractors, agencies and organizations that you aren’t familiar with and may have overlooked?

Many job seekers tend to want a list of prospective employers, but that doesn’t address an individual’s preferences, goals, interests, experiences, background or desires. Based on your academic degree and passion, determine the general industry or focus that fits your education or your ideals and desires.

So, where can you begin to search for and research companies?

Take advantage of Embry-Riddle’s Career Services resources for your initial landing site.

  • Embry-Riddle Career Services website: http://careers.erau.edu/
    • Useful Links (Links to 100s of corporate websites, government agency websites, specific population websites, job search engines)
  • EagleHire via Ernie (Research potential employers)
  • Company presentations on-campus (Learn about companies directly from company representatives)
  • Career Services Organization on Bb > External Links
    • Career Shift (Company information and contacts from a compilation of job boards)
    • Going Global (Corporate profiles for worldwide companies in various industries)
    • AWIN, Aviation Week Intelligence Network including the World Aviation Directory also called the WAD (Utilized to conduct company research)
  • Embry-Riddle Hunt Memorial Library
    • Hoover’s – ProQuest Central online database/Publications Search for Hoover’s (Company information)
    • Business Insights: Essentials online database (Business profiles)
    • Business Source Complete online database (Business profiles)
    • AWIN -Aviation Week Intelligence Network including World Aviation Directory online database called the WAD (Utilized to conduct company research)
  • Corporate Company websites
  • Government Agency websites
  • Networking, contacts and connections
  • Social Media (LinkedIn-professional networking; Facebook; Twitter; Pinterest; Instagram)
  • Google searches on companies
  • Magazine articles
  • Trade Publications (Employers industry activity; contributions related to their field and organization)
  • Professional Associations (See how employers contribute to the profession)
  • Advertisements (Marketing information may be a key to how successful a company is in business)
  • Conferences (Opportunities to talk with company representatives attending professional conferences)
  • Faculty (Connections to industry from research and prior careers)
  • Databases (Targeted business profiles and information)
    • Dun & Bradstreet

Now that you know where to search for companies and view their profiles, you’ll be able to decide with confidence whether the company culture, growth, strategies, goals, policies, values, and mission of the company align with your current and future expectations. Discovering additional companies outside your initial handful expands your employment potential and opportunity for success.

Once you’ve searched, researched, and concluded a company is right for you, hence, earn your paycheck from, you’ll still have to apply, interview and be selected for a position. Remember, it is 100% your choice to apply to companies in which you have an interest and it is also 100% your choice whether you accept a company or organization’s offer of employment. Your choice will be based on an educated decision!

Sally Richards has 30 years of experience in higher education with a proven track record in Career Services. Sally started her career with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Aeronautical Engineering Department.  Currently as the Career Services Cooperative Education/Internship Program Manager, she manages and facilitates operations of the Co-op/Intern Program for the team of Program Managers and ensures adherence of Co-op policies and procedures while overseeing conflict resolution for co-op situations. Her credentials include aviation/airline industry experience in flight recruiting, maintenance planning and passenger service with two major airlines and one regional carrier, as well as studies at Kent State University in Ohio.

Alumni Spotlight: Deric S. Dymerski

Deric S. Dymerski is a December 1990 graduate from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach.  His Deric Dymeskydegree was in Aeronautical Science and he is currently President of Atlas Aviation.

Can you please discuss your career path since graduating from Embry-Riddle?

I started at the customer service desk for Butler Aviation at Palm Beach International Airport (PBI), and went through the merger that formed Signature Flight Support.  After a couple months, I was promoted to Operations Supervisor, and eventually Airlines Supervisor (mostly for a UPS freight and cargo operation).  After a few years, I took a job as General Manager for Hawthorne Aviation (which became Piedmont-Hawthorne and is now Landmark Aviation) at Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport (KLAL).  There, I was promoted to Regional Manager and covered four FBOs in Florida, two in Georgia and two in North Carolina.  After several years in the position, I left to form my own company and find an airport suitable for my own FBO plan.

After a year of doing some FBO consulting, my new company (Atlas Aviation) won the RFP for FBO services at Peter O. Knight Airport (KTPF) in Tampa, Florida.  We’ve now been here just over 10 years, and have a busy Part 61 and Part 141 flight school (Cessna Pilot Center), a full aircraft maintenance shop (Cessna Single Engine Service Center) and the full ground services of tiedown, hangar storage and aviation fuels.  We have hosted AOPA Expo and AOPA Summit at our airport, and continue to host several, large special events each year.  We have recently expanded into aircraft painting, and plan on a full avionics shop next.

Why is involvement in organizations outside the workplace important? 

I have been a member and attended the Annual Meeting of the Florida Aviation Trades Association for nearly 20 years. A few years into it, I was nominated to the Board of Directors, and learned a TON from the people I met and still call friends.  When it came time to start my own company, each service or vendor I needed came from my contacts within the organization; what an incredible support network for an independent company!  Once settled into Atlas, I rejoined the Board and am currently serving as President (we’ve changed our name to the Florida Aviation Business Association www.FABA.Aero).  Meeting and communicating regularly with other industry professionals (ERAU has a seat on the Board) is an incredible resource for running a business.

What has been your greatest achievement in your career?

Having come from a background of larger, “chain” type FBOs, I was warned by many that you couldn’t make a living selling Avgas, and certainly not with a flight school or even maintenance.  Many had the “gas and grass” mentality, and subbed out all the other services and just collected rent.  We now have a proven business model of teaching people to fly, then supporting our other departments by servicing the airplanes the new pilots ultimately buy (some simply continue to rent from our fleet, of course).  We have several tenants on their second or third aircraft upgrade since we taught them to fly.  We have made the “against the odds” business model work by hiring exceptional people and cultivating a professional yet fun atmosphere at the airport.

What advice do you have for current and/or graduating students to make them competitive in today’s workplace?

We’ve always appreciated ERAU grads and have several working for us.  More than education or experience (though both are factors), we look for a great ATTITUDE in an employee.  You should be willing to learn as you go, have a smile on your face and have an honest desire to help customers.  That will make both your career and the company for whom you work successful; I love what I do!

 

Advantages of Job Shadowing

By: Sandi OhmanJob Shadowing

What is job shadowing? As the name implies job shadowing is the process of following, like a shadow, another person in a specific job or career position/field/industry. For someone who is looking to find out about a specific career path, this is an excellent opportunity to see what the job is like over a short period of time. This activity can typically last a few hours, a day, or a week. Job shadowing is encouraged for middle and high-school aged students, as they learn about different career paths. However it is not just for this group, as college students, and people looking to switch careers could find this activity very useful. Job shadowing is also an extension of informational interviewing http://careers.erau.edu/land-offer/interviewing/informational-interviewing/index.html

The obvious advantage of job shadowing is that it allows a person to learn about specific career paths, as mentioned above. Learning about skills needed for specific careers is another advantage of job shadowing. An additional advantage is being able to learn more about a specific company and its culture. This could help determine if this is a company they really want to work for in the future. While this can be hard to determine in a few hours or even days, it is still a good view into possible career fields, which can promote further questions, research, and/or evaluation.

Where should someone start the search for job shadowing opportunities?

  • Check the Career Services Office for connections in the career area of interest. Many times they work with alumni in a specific career area of interest as well as companies that typically recruit specific career areas.
  • Local companies that offer careers in the area(s) of interest
  • If a current student or an alumnus, ask faculty who teach in the areas of interest if they would recommend a contact
  • Personal network – people know people in all areas of careers. Don’t underestimate connections!
  • Professional organizations could offer excellent connections for job shadowing opportunities – conferences, events, membership directories or other members

For more detailed information regarding Job Shadowing, check out the Quintessential Careers blog, Research Companies and Careers Through Job Shadowing (http://www.quintcareers.com/job_shadowing.html)

Sandi Ohman is the Senior Program Manager in the Career Services Office at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  She has been with the university for over 9 years and has advised students in most all degree areas while in Career Services.  Sandi brings additional experience having worked in the finance industry for over 6 years in her previous career.  She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from the University of Florida, and her Master of Arts degree in Educational Leadership from the University of Central Florida.

Alumni Spotlight: Richard Zaher

Richard Zaher is the founder and CEO of Paramount Business Jets. He is a pilot as well as a graduate of Embry-Riddle Richard ZaherAeronautical University with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Studies. A seasoned international jet charter expert, entrepreneur, humanitarian and the recipient of the “Eagle Excellence Award” at the 2012 NBAA convention, he is an active member of the Air Charter Association North America, National Business Aviation Association, Baltic Air Charter Association, European Business Aviation Association, and Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

Discuss your career path since graduating from Embry-Riddle?

When I graduated from ERAU, I was ready to take on the world. Based on my major of Aerospace Studies, I had a great background in Science, Humanity and Aviation Safety. I also had over 400 hours of flight time. Now there was a decision to make upon graduation. To either continue to fly and become a flight instructor (to build more time), or to go to NYC and work on my other passions, “Sales” and “Movies”.

After much due diligence I decided to move to NYC. I intended to survive by working as a salesperson and selling the most expensive products available to support myself. Also, I did not need to drive or own a car in NYC. This plan was in process without knowing until much later, that the expensive product I would sell were private jets.

What advice do you have for current students in order to be successful in the job market?

My first job after graduating was working for a company selling water filtration systems in New York City. By this time I was ready to take any job my mom would approve. I had found the ad in the NY Times employment section. Soon, all the employees were watching a video and learning about testing and proving that existing water needed filtration. I was willing to give this job a fair chance, until I found out that there was a membership fee involved on my part, and I would have to get my friends involved. My short-term goal and high hopes of becoming the most successful water filtration salesperson in NYC ended with a screeching halt.

I am a firm believer of creating our own reality. We influence our future by our actions of today. Developing skills such as leadership, critical thinking, problem solving and the ability to work well with others certainly helps. But on a grand scale, I suggest to learn to listen to that little voice of yours in the back your mind and it will guide you and tell you right from wrong on your journey. At first you may have to take on odd jobs to survive, but long term it will be important to develop a specialty and a career that you love. Build on your strengths, compensate for weaknesses and value differences. The rest is as Elvis said: “The world’s a stage, and each must play a part”.

Can you discuss your current venture as the founder of Paramount Business Jets?

I have a dream job and I love every minute of my work. As the CEO of the company I am involved in every aspect of our operations such as marketing, sales, accounting, technology development and future growth. I personally work with a few clients considering my schedule. Some trips I am currently working on are:

- Organizing a series of flights for a Royal Princess and her family around Europe by private jet.

- Organizing a sports team VIP charter for a group of 45 passengers.

- Arranging a private charter for a well known Corporate Executive and his family to vacation in Cabo San Lucas.

Tell us about Paramount Business Jets and what you contribute its success to?

I started Paramount Business Jets in NYC in 2005. My aim was to create a more cost effective and reliable way to fly private, through the use of technology and fair ethical business practices. We are a worldwide private jet charter brokerage offering private jet charter flights to and from any destination in the world with as little as 4 hours of notice. We represent our clients in the marketplace for safety, reliability, quality equipment and price.

We don’t own any aircraft. Instead, we have developed a network of over 15,000 accredited aircraft of all sizes available for hire, which we contract to provide our clients the safest jets at the lowest prices. Our method of flying privately is Charter, the most cost effective option when compared to Whole Ownership, Fractional Ownership and/or Fixed Hourly Jet Card Programs.

The innovations in technology in recent years have transformed the air charter brokerage industry to become more resourceful. Our website (www.paramountbusinessjets.com) alone has over 10,000 pages, including every private jet aircraft type and specifications, airports worldwide, instant charter quote system, time and distance calculator, airport proximity tool, a charter jet glossary developed by Riddle students and much more.

We are currently researching over 1000 charters a month and we grew 1093% between 2009 and 2012. In 2013 Paramount Business Jets ranked as the 2nd fastest growing travel company in America by INC 500.

I contribute our success to our dedicated, experienced and talented Team Members with whom I have the pleasure to work with, our ability to provide excellent and personalized service to our clients and most important, our corporate culture of fair and ethical business practices. I would like to take this opportunity to thank my honorable professors who helped me to personally develop between 1994 and 1999, extraordinary Faculty at ERAU for all their kind support, Cafeteria Staff and Financial Aid Department, Office of Admissions, ERAU Career Services, ERAU Flight Department, ERAU Alumni Relations and Association, Director of Development as well as all the bright and intelligent ERAU interns that have worked with us and helped us over the years.

I would like to give special thanks to ERAU Professor, Educator and Aviator, Dr. Margaret F. Klemm for being one of our Honored Advisors and believing in our vision. I would like to thank Professor and Dr. Janet Preston for taking the time to explain life’s journey through philosophy. I would like to thank my first Flight Instructor, Craig A. Siemer (he is First Officer now for Delta Airlines and on our Board of Advisors) for expertly teaching me how to fly and being a role model. Thank you to Dr. Norman Brown for helping me learn more about myself through psychology and Dr. Robert Oxley for being an inspiration and making me think. Finally, I would like to thank Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University for making an invaluable and ongoing contribution to my career and my life.

 

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