Co-op/Internship Spotlight from Summer 2013: Jeremy Asomaning

“You go to school for a degree that makes you marketable, but an internship can land you a career.” (JP Hansen, career expert and author of the Bliss List) 

Embry-Riddle’s Cooperative Education/Internship Program at the Daytona Beach campus had 144 participants this past summer term.  Students gained practical work experiences in co-op or internship positions with approximately 103 companies in the U.S. and across the globe.  Several students already have full-time job offers, once they graduate, from the host company. 

Jeremy is just one of the students whose summer was spent gaining valuable experience in an environment where a student is being mentored and supervised by other professionals.  Interns often have the opportunity to learn from the company or organization team members and network while working in a corporate culture.  They develop new skills and enhance others, including decision making, leadership and communication while making the transition from student to professional. 

Jeremy studied and analyzed  the existing structure in the 787 to determine which structures would be impacted after structural changes were complete. It involved the use of Boeing Software which was able to load the entire geometry of an airplane unto one’s  computer screen. He had to undergo a month-long training to learn how to use this and other software.

Jeremy studied and analyzed the existing structure in the 787 to determine which structures would be impacted after structural changes were complete. It involved the use of Boeing Software which was able to load the entire geometry of an airplane unto one’s computer screen. He had to undergo a month-long training to learn how to use this and other software.

Jeremy Asomaning, Aerospace Engineering

Structural Engineering – Design Intern

Boeing Commercial Aircraft,  Everett, Washington

Here is Jeremy’s feedback on his experience.

As a Structures-Design intern on the 787 Program this summer, most of my work was centered around performing a study on the structure in the upper half fuselage section, right above the wings of the 787-10.

I had to become familiar with and analyze the structure in this part of the airplane, which took weeks to complete, after which I documented and presented my findings to leadership on which structures would be impacted upon resizing some key structures within this area.

Working at The Boeing Company has been absolutely phenomenal. I had the opportunity to learn and be taught by people who were experts in their respective fields. I was also challenged by my project as it involved the use of new software to be able to successfully carry out the tasks assigned to me.  At Boeing, everyone worked together for the success of the project and that meant that you could walk up to anyone and ask them for their help or advice on what you were working on. People were just glad when you showed interest in what their work entailed or when you sought their expertise on a problem.

I also had the opportunity to work with other interns on a project which was highly beneficial. This experience with other intern teams helped me to better understand how iterative the process of building an aircraft is. There was heavy team collaboration which involved meeting regularly to discuss progress as well as challenges which kept springing up. One key thing which helped us to come up with solutions quickly to the problems we faced was the nature of our group intern project; Boeing gave us, interns, room to come up with solutions or figure it out. We were not restricted on how deep we could go or how broad we could extend our study to. Through this, we were able to develop an engineering mindset and come up with solutions which on some occasions had never been tried  or thought of by the company’s engineers.

Overall Boeing invested into me, giving me the opportunity to not only learn new skills but to think farther outside box.

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