December 2014 Graduates’ First Destinations

On Monday morning, the Daytona Beach Career Services team was at graduation collecting data for the campus-specific First Destination Survey. We thought you might like to see a sampling of where Daytona Beach graduates are heading after they walked across the stage at the Ocean Center this past Monday.

If you recently graduated from the Daytona Beach or Prescott residential campus and still don’t have a job, please contact Career Services for guidance and resources that can help you attain employment. Click on the appropriate campus link to view a list of services offered by Career Services.

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Happy Thanksgiving!

happy-thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving!

From,

The Career Services Office

Companies Attending ERAU Daytona Beach’s Industry/Career Expo

The Daytona Beach Industry/Career Expo is Wednesday, October 8!LinkedHeroImage (1) (2)

Industry/Career Expo: Wednesday, October 8 in the ICI Center from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

See below for a list of the employers who will be in attendance, collecting resumes and/or speaking with candidates regarding full-time and co-op/internship positions. Click on the company’s link to visit the website to learn more about the employer and specific career opportunities that are available.

We look forward to seeing you at the Industry/Career Expo in Daytona Beach!

Alumni Spotlight: Leland C Shanle

Leland C Shanle is a graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Shanle is a pilot, award winning author, and military/aviation technical adviser for the movie industry. His consulting projects include Pearl Harbor, Behind Enemy Lines, xXx, The Day After Tomorrow and Stealth. His production company–Broken Wing Productions–has worked on several aviation-based movies and series including the Discovery Curiosity Series; Plane Crash.

Shanle is the author of three books; Project Seven Alpha, Vengeance at Midway and Guadalcanal, and ENDGAME in the Pacific–with the fourth slated for release in 2014. He has also written for Aerospace Testing International Magazine and is a Contributing Editor to Airways Magazine. Shanle has adapted his book, Project 7 Alpha as a screenplay for a major motion picture studio.

Shanle’s lifelong interest in Aviation is a family legacy. His Grandfather was in the airline industry in the 1920s and two uncles (Bob USAF, Larry USN) were combat military aviators. Shanle flew naval aircraft in 10 squadrons; including the F-4 Phantom II, EA-6B Prowler and TA-4 Skyhawk. Attached to CAG 5, 11 and 1 cruising on the USS Midway, America and Lincoln; Leland flew 80 missions over the war torn skies of Bosnia, Somalia, and Iraq.

He got into the flight test world when transferred to VX-30, Naval Weapons Test Center Point Mugu. He flew as a Project Officer on various test programs and was the Squadron Operations Officer. Shanle also attended the Project Officer/Engineers and the Out of Control Flight courses at National Test Pilot School. He was inducted as a Full Member in the Society of Experimental Test Pilots (SETP) in 1998.

Closing out his Naval Aviation career with 600 carrier landings (200 night) on 11 different carriers; he continues his Aviation career as a Boeing 777 pilot with American Airlines.

Can you please discuss your experience working with UAVs?

I was attached to VX-30 and was the head of the QF-4 program. I had the unique perspective of actually riding in drones. Yes; I was a drone pilot…or Spam, as we called it. We would have to test the system, a UHF data link system, fairly archaic technology by today’s standards; by flying the pattern and doing touch and goes on San Nicholas Island off the coast of LA. Being in an F-4 Phantom while someone flew it from 75 miles away could be quite a ride. The runway on San Nic was on a 500 foot cliff; more than once I looked up to see it before crying uncle and taking control. We also had to test new software loads for controls/self protect modes; which also was quite a ride at times: stalls, straight up departures from controlled flight, etc. Being a UCC controller was a very perishable skill; it is the only thing I’ve done in my career as hard or harder than a night carrier landing. We used what looked like a simulator with a 5X5 TV screen; we landed on San Nic with just that little picture. At the time San Nic was a 5,000 foot runway due to construction, so we dropped the hook and took the wire like on the ship.

The drone was controlled from Naval Test Center Point Mugu with a range of 300 miles. It was an all aspect, fully functional aerial target. We could launch weapons or other drones and dog fight from the NOLO (No On-board Live Operator) QF-4. Our mission was to test new weapons systems and provide Fleet readiness. We normally used telemetry heads instead of war heads to save the assets.

We also launched and remotely or pre-programmed controlled other drones pictured here:

AS 16 launch

A QF-4N launching an MA-31. The MA-31 was a converted Soviet AS-17 Krypton missile. After failing to duplicate the performance of the Soviet system, when the Wall came down we bought a few.

aqm 37

An AQM-37 Super Sonic drone. We would launch the AQM-37 from a QF-4 Phantom at 1.5 Mach and 50,000 feet and then turn 90 degrees out and run like hell. Because the Fleet ships would then start shooting Surface to Air Missiles at it (had an old bud shot down by a CIWS once, he didn’t like it much).

c 130 with drones

A BQM-74 Chukar on a LC-130 wing station with another LC-130 in background. With this drone system we could launch raids against the Fleet.

NOLO F 4

QF-4N NOLO; (look close no pilot) over San Nic Island.

DSC00594

QB-727 and a chase C-337.

My most recent experience was as the CEO of Broken Wing LLC and droning a Boeing-727 for the Discovery Channel Documentary on aircraft survivability. We put together the old Point Mugu Team for that.

In your opinion, what do you think the future of UAVs will be in the United States?

So where is the Drone Industry going? There is one little problem with drones…they crash, a lot. Broken Wing is working on a project that shows some of the vulnerabilities of mixing manned/un-manned flight. Putting aside loose cannons who are flying drones illegally there is still massive vulnerabilities. Companies that are jumping into delivering products via drones will have a serious decision to ponder when the law suits start flying. Imagine a drone with a pizza and 6 pack dropping over LA like a stone; or one that has gone rogue getting sucked up an intake of an airliner on short final. Real threats.

That having been said; in low density or military applications I think the future is bright for UAVs. They will continue to be in great demand for border protection, observation for police/FBI applications and as a Strike/INTEL platform for all of the military services. From hand held airborne cameras for the Infantry to carrier launched Strike aircraft they will continue to multiply. The up side of unmanned flight in those arenas cannot be overstated.

Now for the 500 pound gorilla in the room: passenger aircraft applications. Personally, I would never get in one. From my perspective, having been one of the few people on earth to have actually ridden in one, no way! In the QF-4 I could take control when things got bad. Has your computer and/or IPhone ever just frozen up or done things you didn’t want it to? You see my point. Redundant systems? Google QF-72 (Qantas Flight 72) a bad system locked out two good systems and almost killed everyone on board.

Practically? Hugely expensive, drones have a very long tech-tail. Operationally? It would reduce the air traffic like a bad weather day. Airports like San Diego, Washington DC and LaGuardia could not be used due to the visual requirements on a normal day. Pilots make the air traffic flow in spite of how over loaded the system is. And on windy days? Simply they would have to shut down the airport. Even the most modern auto-land systems have wind restrictions that are half what the aircraft is capable of landing in (with a pilot).

In summary: imagine a QB-777 dropping on downtown USA some night? The company operating it would be out of business and Congress would out-law the systems immediately. Risk vs. Reward.

For more discussion about the developing unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) industry, tune-in online at 7 p.m. on Sept. 18 for the inaugural Lift, Off the Page roundtable event, featuring Embry-Riddle faculty experts and alumni working in the UAS field. Register to attend: http://alumni.erau.edu/LiftEvent. And, read the fall edition of Lift http://alumni.erau.edu/lift

Dressing for Success

By: Brian Carhide

professional dressIt is the beginning of the fall 2014 semester and the campuses are buzzing with excitement and Eagle Pride! Many of the seasoned students know that the fall semester is the time to dust off the suit and shine the shoes. On Thursday October 2, 2014 and Wednesday October 8, 2014, respectively, the Prescott and Daytona Beach campuses will be hosting their annual Industry/Career Expo. The events are professional dress events and to those who have experienced the Industry/Career Expo know that looking your best is essential to success.

If you are attending the Expo and whether you are seeking a job or just networking, we encourage professional dress to make that crucial first impression count. Dressing professionally not only shows an employer you mean business, but it exudes confidence. It lets the employer know that you are serious about being a part of their team. The aviation/aerospace industry expectations are that of basic colors, clean look, and conservative styles. Below are some general guidelines for both male and female expo dress:

Female

The Suit

  • Fabric: the best choice is 100% wool
  • A suit with a knee-length skirt and a tailored blouse is most appropriate
  • The most suitable colors include charcoal, medium gray, steel gray, black, and navy blue
  • Jackets should be simple, well-tailored and stylish, and fall just at the hips
  • Jackets should have smooth seams, even hemlines, correctly hanging linings, and well-sewn buttons

The Skirt

  • A skirt should fall just at or no more than 2” above the knee; stick with solid colors
  • A one-piece business dress with a matching jacket is popular

The Blouse

  • It is best to wear long sleeves; it projects an authoritative, professional look
  • Never wear a sleeveless blouse
  • Solid colors and natural fabrics are the best selections (particularly cotton and silk)
  • Acceptable colors include white and cream. Pale pink, soft yellow or light blue (only if it works with the overall look)
  • A classic softened collar works best with suits. The button-down collar should be worn when interviewing with a conservative company

The Shoes

  • They should preferably be leather
  • Colors; brown, black, navy, or burgundy
  • The color should always be the same as or a darker tone than your skirt
  • Flats are fine; a shoe with a heel of up to about 2 ½ “ is perfectly acceptable
  • The pump is the safest and most conservative look; a closed heel with a slightly open toe and the sling-back shoe with a closed toe are also acceptable

Male

The Suit

  • The most acceptable colors are navy through medium blue and black through charcoal
  • Fabric should be 100% wool. Why? Wool looks and wears better than any other material
  • Pinstripes are acceptable, so long as the stripes are very narrow and muted
  • A well-fitted two-piece suit is preferable; more refined, less showy
  • There should be no pull at the jacket shoulders, no gape at the back, and the cuffs should break at your wrists

The Shirt

  • Rule One: Always wear a long-sleeved shirt
  • Rule Two: Always wear a white, cream, or pale blue shirt
  • Rule Three: Never violate Rules One or Two
  • Remember, the paler and more subtle the shade, the better the impression you will make
  • Make sure your shirt fits properly; the collar should fit the neck properly

The Neckwear (Ties)

  • A pure silk tie makes the most powerful professional impact, has the best finish and feel, and is the easiest to tie
  • When tied, the tie should cover the belt buckle
  • Most appropriate knots are: Four-in-Hand, Windsor, and Half Windsor

The Shoes

  • They should either be black or brown
  • Lace-up wing tips are the most conservative choice and are most universally accepted

For additional resources on dress visit: http://careers.erau.edu/land-offer/interviewing/prepare/index.html

The career services office wants you to be successful, and if you do not have a suit or are not seeking a job or internship, we still encourage you to dress professionally. Please refrain from wearing items such as shorts, t-shirts, blue (or any other color) jeans, sandals, etc. (military and religious attire is acceptable). If you are not dressed in a suitable manner, you will be asked to change and return to the event. It is in your best interest to be dressed appropriately and save the shorts and flip flops for after the event.

Have a great semester and we look forward to seeing you in October at the Industry/Career Expo!

Brian Carhide has more than 20 years of professional aviation experience. He spent many years as a professional pilot, including experience as a charter and airline pilot. He has been a leader in guiding young aviators in higher education at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and is the Executive Director of Career Services.

Co-op Assistance Award Winners

The Co-op Assistance Award Program provides financial awards to a few deserving students each summer who participate in the University’s Co-op/Internship Program.  The Program helps students minimize their financial concern by helping them defray some additional expenses that would be incurred during the work term and allowing the students to get the maximum benefit from a great co-op or internship opportunity.  The Award Program which has been in existence since summer 2003 with $16,500 awarded to 60 students is funded by employers, alumni and the Career Services team .  Congratulations to the 13 Daytona Beach students who received a Co-op Award for the summer 2014.money

Jeremy Asomaning – Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering

The Boeing Company, Everett, WA; Structures Airframe Intern

 

Jacob Clinard – Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering

Rolls-Royce Corporation, Indianapolis, IN; Design Engineer Summer Intern

 

Samantha DeMarco – Master of Science in Engineering Physics/Space Physics

U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM; Research Scientist Intern

 

Davin Fonseka – Bachelor of Science in Aviation Management Science

Cape Air, Hyannis, MA; A&P Maintenance Intern

 

Zorororashe Gandiya – Master of Business Administration

Lufthansa Technik Component Services, Miramar, FL; Intern

 

Amy George – Bachelor of Science in Human Factors Psychology

Lockheed Martin Corporation, Ft Worth, TX; Technical Intern

 

Zachary Goff – Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering

AAI Corporation, Hunt Valley, MD; Systems Engineering Intern

 

Kristia Harris – Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Teledyne Oil & Gas, Daytona Beach, FL; New Product Development Intern

 

Shizhen Huang – Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering

Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (NAWCTSD), Orlando, FL; Apprenticeship Program

 

Calvin Pereira – Associate of Science in Aviation Maintenance Science

Cape Air, Hyannis, MA; A&P Maintenance Intern

 

Carl Phelps – Bachelor of Science in Unmanned Aircraft Systems Science

Grimmster, Port Orange, FL; Engineering Intern

 

Jay Rowland – Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Cessna Aircraft Company (Textron Aviation), Wichita, KS; Engineering Product Support Engineer

 

Michelle Sinagra – Master of Science in Human Factors & Systems

Express Employment Professionals/Embraer Executive Jets, Melbourne, FL; Designer Intern

 

Below are some highlights of gratitude from the award winners:

“I just really appreciate the help that I have gotten from Career Services!”

“I would like to thank you and the entire Career Services office for this award. I truly appreciate the support and please know that it will be very helpful while I am going through my internship…”

“I’d like to thank you and the other members of career services for this award! It is greatly appreciated and will be very helpful for my internship. Thanks again!”

“I want to say an even bigger thank you for awarding me the Co-Op/Intern Assistance Award! I am so excited. This will definitely help with the costs of setting up at the company for the summer. Please extend my thanks to Brian and the rest of the Career Services Staff.”

“This is great news!”

 

 

The Prescott, AZ and Daytona Beach, FL Campuses Announce the Annual Industry/Career Expos

SAVE THE DATE! 

The Prescott, Arizona, campus will host their annual Industry/Career Expo on Thursday, October 2, 2014.  Information is available at http://prescott.erau.edu/campus-services/career/career-expo/industry-career-expo-prescott-campus.html.  Employers can register here

Prescott Expo - 2014

The Daytona Beach, Florida, campus will host their annual Industry/Career Expo on Wednesday, October 8, 2014.  General information is found at http://careers.erau.edu/events/industry-career-expo-daytona-beach.html, and information specific to students and alumni can be found here.  Employers can register for the event here

Blog image for DB Expo

Career Week 360° on the Daytona Beach Campus

Embry-Riddle students and alumni are invited to attend the various events occurring during Career Week 360° on the Daytona Beach campus.

Career Week 360° is an all-encompassing career-focused week, encouraging students to take a complete 360° look at their professional futures by exploring career development opportunities.

Spring 2014 Career Week Summary Flyer

Daytona Beach Students…Apply for the Co-op/Internship A$$istance Award

money$$Free Money!$$

Apply for the Co-op/Internship A$$istance Award

Daytona Beach students can apply for a Career Services-sponsored Co-op/Internship A$$istance Award (up to $500) to help defray some expenses they may incur when they go on a Co-op or Internship experience during the summer semester. Money could be used for gasoline to travel to the industry site, for professional clothes to wear at work, to help pay rent, to pay for lodging if they non-rev to Paris, or even to dine at Chick-Fil-A.

Companies, alumni, and ERAU staff members have made tax deductible donations to the Co-op/Internship A$$istance Program in order for Career Services to offer several deserving Co-op/Intern students a little extra money for expenses during the summer Co-op/Intern semester. Their generosity has helped to minimize a student’s financial concern, relieving a little bit of the financial burden and therefore allowing a student to get the maximum benefit from the practical work experience. The Program began in 2003 and will continue each summer semester, as long as funding is available. Last summer, 10 students were each awarded $100-$400.

At the time of application, candidates must comply with University Co-op/Intern policy and be registered in EagleHire Network with an approved resume uploaded.  They must have already had a mandatory advising session to verify co-op/intern eligibility including GPA and credit hour requirements. Applicants must have signed a Student Agreement and be degree-seeking DB students enrolled full-time in the current and past semester in order to be considered.

REQUIRED DOCUMENTS INCLUDE:
RESUME
TRANSCRIPT
ESSAY (one page max/double spaced); answer ALL of the following:
-If you are awarded co-op assistance, explain how this financial award (up to $500) would benefit you.
-How important has financial assistance been in your pursuit to complete your education?
-Are there situations or circumstances that are challenging or hardships that you have had to overcome?

Submissions of Resume, Transcript, and Essay are due by Friday, April 4, 2014.

Email documents to:  Sally.Richards@erau.edu.

A committee of Career Services staff members will select the Award recipients. Recipients will be awarded a Co-op/Internship A$$istance monetary Award for Summer 2014, provided the recipient has been selected by a company/organization for a Summer 2014 Co-op/Internship AND completed a  Co-op/Intern contract to register for university credit. This contract must be completed with Career Services by Friday, May 2, 2014 in order to receive the Award.

Contact Sally Richards for information.  To make an online tax deductible contribution to the Program, go to this link:  http://www.alumnifidelity.com/ERAU/CoopInternAssistance.html.

Save the Date for Career Week 360°

Introducing Career Week 360°!

The Daytona Beach Campus is hosting a week long series of career-related events on March 3-7, 2014.  The week will encourage job seekers to take a complete 360° view of their professional future, from planning to practicing.  There will be a two-day employer showcase, guest speakers, a networking skill builder session and more.

The agenda will continue to be updated as we get closer to the event.

Spring 2014 Career Week Summary Flyer

 

 

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