Companies Attending ERAU Daytona Beach’s Industry/Career Expo

The Daytona Beach Industry/Career Expo is Wednesday, October 8!LinkedHeroImage (1) (2)

Industry/Career Expo: Wednesday, October 8 in the ICI Center from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

See below for a list of the employers who will be in attendance, collecting resumes and/or speaking with candidates regarding full-time and co-op/internship positions. Click on the company’s link to visit the website to learn more about the employer and specific career opportunities that are available.

We look forward to seeing you at the Industry/Career Expo in Daytona Beach!

Your Twitter Brand: How to be “Job Search Ready”

Twitter1Still not sure about using Twitter as a job search platform? Or maybe you have yet to jump on the Twitter train. While Twitter has quickly become one of the best ways to stay up-to-date with what your favorite celebrities and public figures are doing in between photo shoots and vacations, Twitter can serve the same purpose when it comes to following your favorite companies. {Insert at-your-fingertips networking and career preparation here} By centering your twitter on companies and industries you can have an endless feed of news, positions, updates, and insight to help you get ahead. To get you started, a career focused bio can identify what makes you, YOU. This can be your brand, mission, interests and voice in 140 characters or less.

Here are some tips for making your profile job search friendly:

-List ERAU in your bio. This is a 160-character elevator pitch. Since Twitter is all about statements that are short and sweet, make use of this precious space to ensure that you are easily identifiable and current.

-Use twitter handles and hashtags that highlight your student involvement/organizations. Showcase not only who you are and what you are interested in, but show some love for your social channels.

“ERAU c/o 2015: Major, Aerospace Engineering-Propulsion. Minor, Mechanical Engineering. Team Lead, @EcoEagles. Aviation Enthusiast. #roboticsnerd #pilot”

-List current employers and their social profiles. This can get you larger exposure and again, give the viewer of your profile a quick view of your current employment status.

-Make your personal brand your own. Use leftover space to generate your voice/passions/interests/abilities etc. by listing awards or accomplishments. Take advantage of being able to stand out with your distinct uniqueness.

-Help the reader understand what your interests are on Social Media platforms– what do you find yourself talking about on Twitter? Sharing this will help people know what you are going to talk about and subsequently make them want to follow you.

“@EmbryRiddle 2014: MBA Student. @SouthwestAir analyst intern. @NBAA treasurer. All things aviation, avid traveler, on-the-side photog, entrepreneur, future CEO.”

– Twitter can be used as a professional or personal brand. But remember that anyone can search for you and find the images you use to identify yourself. Make sure that even if this is more of a personal channel for you, that your image conveys your overall brand.

-Lastly, remember that Twitter isn’t just about what you have to say, it’s about starting conversations. Engaging in what people are saying within your topics of interest can lead to following more companies, learning about their hiring trends, finding the open positions, and ultimately helping you land a job!

Twitter2Looking for recommendations on who to start following? Check out these tweeters: https://eraucso.wordpress.com/2011/12/16/best-job-search-resources-on-twitter/

This article adapted from (http://thesocialu101.com/5-quick-tips-for-a-great-twitter-bio/)

Emily Ferraro is new to the Career Services Office at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and serves as the Program Manager for undergraduate Aerospace Engineering students. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies as well as her Master of Education in Curriculum & Instruction specializing in College Student Affairs at the University of South Florida in Tampa, FL. Emily enjoys working with students to help them achieve their personal and professional career goals and specializes in topics such as personal branding and resume writing.

Tailor your Resume for YOU

resumetipspicBy Emily Ferraro

Embarking on a job search can often lead one through a lot of stress, uncertainty, and even sometimes doubt.  It’s important to remind yourself that you are just as important to an employer as they are to you. After all, there are two components to this process: the employer and YOU. More often than not, students are so eager to get a position that they forget what makes them unique and important compared to other applicants. Tailoring your resume isn’t just for the employer; it’s the first step in realizing your potential with a company. Of course, you need to appeal to an employer to get the job, but you must first appeal to yourself. Start by preparing your resume and cover letter with these tips in mind and be prepared to know your worth!

1. Ask yourself, “Why is it important to tailor my resume?”-

  • Imagine you are an employer receiving hundreds of applications for only one position. When you come across one that has a clear objective/statement that includes the position and company within your goals, you know right away that this resume is just for you. Scanning through the resume, you see that the resume highlights experiences and skills needed for the position in mind because they translate to the position description. Overall, you like to see that an applicant has taken the time to make his or her resume “made to order,” and this is the first step in impressing you.  This is the scenario you want to create when an employer finds your resume. It shows that you comprehend the position and the company’s vision while showing your ability to communicate your skills – a lot like a preview of what’s to come in an interview.
  • Staying true to the position description and highlighting your transferable skills help you understand the position. This is important because you should comprehend as much as you can about what this position requires and what you can bring to the role. It also prevents you from including fibs or extra material that doesn’t pertain. The rule is always quality over quantity. Looking impressive means that you present the real skills, show your true potential, and understand why you are important.

2. Use these methods when tailoring-

  • Most common tactic used when tailoring documents is incorporating keywords or buzzwords. I challenge you to think deeper, don’t just copy paste the words from the position but think about how you can present those key words in the bullet points of your past experiences.
  • Use transferable skills and action verbs! Employers scanning your resume want to see two things: 1. “What did you do?” 2. “How did you do it?” – sweet and simple. Jazz it up with action verbs to set up the skillset you are trying to demonstrate.
  • Get rid of redundancy. Like I mentioned before, quality reigns over quantity. Try not to list everything you have done on your resume and instead incorporate what is most pertinent to this position.

-Tip: Keep a master resume that includes all of your experiences, projects and involvement. Then pick and choose what you want to keep/omit based on what the requirements and skills are for the position. Save the new one as the resume for the specific position in which you are applying by including the company name in the file name (ex: Last name_NASAresume).

  •  Always prove your bullets with supporting examples. A lawyer making their case would never walk into a courtroom without supporting evidence to back their claim. . Think of your bullet points as the supporting evidence; always state your skill but provide a specific example of how you developed that skill. (For example, “Developed research skills by gathering data received from satellite, analyzing for patterns, and formulating the information into organized spreadsheet documents.”)

But you’re not quite done there. Just as important as it is to have a tailored resume, your cover letter will give you an additional edge, and having accomplished your resume means you’re on the right track towards creating a strong cover letter.

  • Even when an employer states that a cover letter is not necessary, I would always recommend writing one. This is the first place to show your ability to go above and beyond what is required of you.
  • When an employer looks over the submitted applications, the candidates with cover letters have put their applications into another category that shows their drive, ability to communicate transferable skills, and an extra ambitious attitude for the position.

Here are some additional tips for tailoring a cover letter:

  • Pick 2-3 specific experiences from your resume that you wish to elaborate on.
  • Organize your paragraphs to show your key skills. In one paragraph, highlight a needed skillset from the position and support it with evidence from your resume. In the next paragraph, highlight a different skillset also needed for the position and demonstrate how you have accomplished those skills.
  • Use the models and examples on our website for more insight on what a cover letter should possess for your specific degree program.

Emily Ferraro is new to the Career Services Office at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and serves as the Program Manager for undergraduate Aerospace Engineering students. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies as well as her Master of Education in Curriculum & Instruction specializing in College Student Affairs at the University of South Florida in Tampa, FL. Emily enjoys working with students to help them achieve their personal and professional career goals and specializes in topics such as personal branding and resume writing.

 

7 Rules for Your LinkedIn Profile Picture

By Emily Ferraro

Always add a professional photo to your LinkedIn profile

Always add a professional photo to your LinkedIn profile

Having an online brand can all be summed up in one picture.  How can you make sure that your picture sends the right message? Hopefully you’re beginning to think about how your professional brand is represented across different social media platforms. The LinkedIn profile picture is the essence of your professional brand. Here are 7 tips to consider when thinking about your image.

1.) First, Make Sure You Have One!

LinkedIn research shows that a page with a profile picture is seven times as likely to be viewed as a page without one.  When someone is looking over your page, they want to gain a connection just like a personal interaction. Having a  professional picture that follows these tips will immediately give them a stronger impression of who you are rather than a blank photo.

2.) No “Selfies” Please!

The self-portrait photo is the most popular style of professional profile pictures, but if you can help it, don’t take the picture by yourself. People viewing your profile will be able to tell if you took this on your laptop or extended your arm to get your whole face in the frame on your cell phone. LinkedIn is not the place for selfies. This does not mean that you must hire a professional photographer but ask a trusted friend or family member to use a high quality camera or phone to take your photo for you.

3.) Photo For One:

Make sure you are the only person in your photo: exclude any and all friends, family, spouses, and pets from the photo. Your LinkedIn profile picture should be focused on you and only you. Try to refrain from using a cropped image where someone has been cut out of the image. If you are serious about your job search and you can’t find a picture of just you, this is the perfect excuse to create a recent and professional image.

4.) Keep Current:

Use a recent photo of yourself. Your brand should be transparent and consistent. You do not want to be unrecognizable in person compared to your profile picture. If you look different than the picture you have posted online, it’s time to post a new one to reflect who you are in person.

5.) Dress To Impress:

Think about how you would dress for an interview or professional networking opportunity in person and dress that way for your profile picture. Remember your profile image should reflect who you are in person; this will help your brand remain professional and reliable.

6.) Be CLEAR:

­Refrain from using photos that are blurry, pixelated, shadowed, or out of focus. You don’t want to be too far away in the picture that you are unable to be identified. When someone reviews your page or sees your photo, nothing is more distracting than a blurry or low-quality image. You want to make the right first impression, and a clear professional quality image is the best indicator that you take your brand seriously.

7.) Look Forward to Your Future:

Your picture should represent you in the best way possible. Be charismatic and smile while looking forward at the camera. Try not to look too serious or stare blankly into the camera. The picture should be a clear picture of your face from the shoulders up. Refrain from using logo’s and designs in the picture.

Emily Ferraro is new to the Career Services Office at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and serves as the Program Manager for undergraduate Aerospace Engineering students. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies as well as her Master of Education in Curriculum & Instruction specializing in College Student Affairs at the University of South Florida in Tampa, FL. Emily enjoys working with students to help them achieve their personal and professional career goals and specializes in topics such as personal branding and resume writing.

U.S. Pilot Hiring 2013

by Brian Carhide

If you peruse some of the pilot forums on the internet for information about professional-programs-banner-lgthe impending pilot shortage, many will say it’s a fairytale. In regards to the big picture, there is truth to that perception. In the U.S., we are still in a hiring lag from the retirement age increase in 2007, and a “true pilot shortage” could still be 5 or more years away – if the FAA doesn’t raise the retirement age, again. One major airline’s recent strategic planning has indicated this may be a possibility.

The good news, according to FAPA, a few of the regional airlines have plans to hire a number of pilots during 2013. The majority of the need for pilots at these regionals is due in part to the new crew rest requirements. The other conundrum to pilot hiring in 2013 is the new law that requires any pilot wanting to fly for a FAR Part 121 passenger carrying operation to have an Air Transport Pilot certificate and 1500 hours total time.

Recently in the Career Services Office, I have communicated with several regional airlines interested in developing pipeline and bridge programs with Embry-Riddle. This is a good indicator that the airlines are seeing a need to have a solid pool of pilots and to aid in bridging the gap for flight instructors to the regional airlines. I feel the regional airlines envision a growing increase in demand and a declining supply of pilots, hence the interest in developing these types of agreements with key organizations.

Since 2013 began, companies seeking qualified flight instructors have plateaued, but there are still an abundance of CFI opportunities to be found. I feel those low-time CFIs that are willing to relocate will find some great time building opportunities and gain valuable experience. Because of the way supply and demand is heading, those motivated pilots who reach 1500 hours will have some golden opportunities during an exciting time for the industry.

Smaller companies outside of the regional airlines are also planning to hire during 2013 but on a smaller scale. Operations such as Ameriflight, Cape Air, and XOJet have indicated they are recruiting and interviewing for pilots. The advantage these companies have is the 1500 hour requirement does not affect them. However, it is still a viable career path and a great way to build some flight time.

2013 may not be the year of the grand pilot shortage we have all been hearing about, but pilot hiring will continue to move in a positive direction. In speaking with one of the recruiters from a regional airline, who has been in this industry for over 30 years, about future pilot hiring, he stated, “This is definitely an exciting time for young pilots!”

Brian Carhide has more than 20 years of professional aviation experience. He spent many years as a professional pilot, including experience as a charter and airline pilot. Recently, he has been a leader in guiding young aviators in higher education at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Fall 2012 Graduates’ First Destinations

On Monday morning, the Daytona Beach Career Services team was at graduation collecting data for our First Destination Survey. While the official report will not be available until summer, we thought you might like to see where Daytona Beach (and a few Worldwide) graduates are heading after they walked across the stage at the Ocean Center this past Monday.

If you recently graduated from a residential campus and still don’t have a job, please contact Career Services for guidance and resources that can help you attain employment. Click on the appropriate campus link to view a list of services offered by Career Services.

Spring Graduates’ First Destinations

On Sunday morning, the Career Services team was at graduation, collecting data for our First Destination Survey. While the official report will not be available for a few weeks, we thought you might like to see where graduates are heading after they walked across the stage this past Sunday.

If you recently graduated and still don’t have a job, please contact Career Services for guidance and resources that can help you attain employment. Click on the appropriate campus link to view a list of services offered by Career Services.

Pilot Hiring in 2012

by Brian Carhide

In 2012, the Mayan calendar will not be the only thing ending. In December, the U.S. airline industry will again be faced with attrition as a result of pilots forced to retire, at the age of 65 (formerly age 60). The FAA rule change in December of 2007 has created five years of stagnation in pilot retiring/hiring, along with the declining economy. In the last five years, pilots have been retiring solely based on their own decisions and not on a federal regulation.

Recently, the airline industry has slightly rebounded, and the last year and a half has provided steady hiring at the regional level; hiring appears to be remaining steady through 2012. There has been speculation and anticipation building in the industry about what will happen come December 2012. There has been a significant amount of chatter of a looming pilot shortage. There is some truth to a pilot shortage; however, that shortage will have a greater impact in the Asian aviation markets as Asian airlines continue to grow and purchase airplanes. I think we will see a slight increase in hiring after December in the U.S., at all levels from CFIs to the major airlines.

In 2011, I had the opportunity to attend two pilot job fairs and mingle with pilot hiring managers from American Eagle to United Airlines, all which exhibited a nervous tone when discussing the future need for pilots within their company. American Eagle has been the regional airline of 2011 for hiring ERAU pilots, based on the current bridge agreement with American Eagle. However, recently American Eagle’s parent company, American Airlines, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, in case you haven’t heard. Obviously the hiring surge from AE has ended for 2012. American Eagle hiring managers are confident hiring will resume in the near future.

Although AE, a viable choice for low time pilots, has ceased hiring for 2012, there continues to be alternate opportunities. A recent trend in the industry is partnerships such as the Cape Air/jetBlue University Gateway Program and the newly released ExpressJet/Delta Air Lines Pilot Pathway Program. These programs are similar in that they provide aspiring pilots a guided path beginning as early as their sophomore year, through to becoming a major airline pilot. Although nothing is guaranteed, especially in the airline industry, the programs can provide pilots the foresight into a more secure career path.

The question students ask me the most:  how do I build flight time? Obtain a CFI and flight instruct, albeit many pilots strive to find another way to accomplish the time building phase of a pilot’s career; in the end it proves advantageous. No matter which way you look at it, flight instructing will place you in another league! (Believe me; hiring managers are aware of this fact). In 2011, flight instructor positions were in abundance, and I have little doubt it will continue in 2012. Honestly, there is probably not a state in this country which does not have available CFI jobs, not even Alaska!

As many of us know, the aviation industry is unpredictable and cyclical. Do everything you can to open doors – take advantage of internships, job fairs, and the Career Services Office. The 2012 year should prove to be a fortuitous year for pilots.

Brian Carhide has more than 20 years of professional aviation experience. He spent many years as a professional pilot, including experience as a charter and airline pilot. Recently, he has been a leader in guiding young aviators in higher education at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.   

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