Companies Attending ERAU Daytona Beach’s Industry/Career Expo

The Daytona Beach Industry/Career Expo is Wednesday, October 8!LinkedHeroImage (1) (2)

Industry/Career Expo: Wednesday, October 8 in the ICI Center from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

See below for a list of the employers who will be in attendance, collecting resumes and/or speaking with candidates regarding full-time and co-op/internship positions. Click on the company’s link to visit the website to learn more about the employer and specific career opportunities that are available.

We look forward to seeing you at the Industry/Career Expo in Daytona Beach!

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2013 Expo Success Story: Chao Zheng

Chao W. Zheng is an Aerospace Engineering major at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach and just Chaofinished a summer internship with Rockwell Collins.

Below is his first-hand experience at the Industry/Career Expo 2013 held in Daytona Beach, FL.

My name is Chao Zheng and I am currently a junior majoring in Aerospace Engineering with a minor in Business Administration at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Over the summer of 2014, I was hired by Rockwell Collins as a Systems Engineer intern working in the Coast Guard & VIP Rotary Platform team. During my time there, I worked on two programs: 1) VH-60N/3D Presidential Helicopter “Marine One” and 2) MH-65E Coast Guard Helicopter “Dolphin”.

During the Embry-Riddle industry career expo, I checked out numerous companies but didn’t have any luck with any of the companies despite going through interviews. During that semester, I was waiting for a Boeing internship offer so I didn’t apply to a lot of other companies. When the spring semester came by, I told myself that I shouldn’t limit my options. That’s when I saw an email about Rockwell Collins coming on campus and they are looking for summer interns and co-ops.

Getting Hired

I first heard about Rockwell Collins through my high school’s Airframe & Powerplant training with their radio systems. Immediately, I went online and did some research about the company and was really impressed by the ethical working environment. So, I brushed up my resume from my COM 219 Tech writing class, went to the Rockwell Collins meet & greet and immediately got another interview offer the next day. At that time, I didn’t keep my hopes high because a lot of the applicants were seniors or graduates so as a sophomore, I feel like I didn’t stand out. So about one month went by, and I got an email from the Rockwell recruiter saying that I am one of their top candidates and requested to have an online interview with a team manager. Little did I know, my manager Matt Mulnik was the head of the Coast Guard & Presidential Helicopter team and one week after my interview with him-I was officially hired.

What I did as an Intern

As an Intern with Rockwell Collins, I was working on two Government Systems program under the rotary wings department. Throughout my 11 weeks internship, I spend about 70% of my time with the Presidential helicopter program and about 30% with the Coast Guard program. As a Systems Engineer, I was working with a couple of test leads performing testing on the helicopter’s avionics systems. Some of the test include: Terrain Awareness Warning System (TAWS), Communication, GPS, Map updates, Radio frequencies, CSFIR (black box), engine simulations, overload systems test and quite a few classified tests. In addition to testing, I learned how to script programs using python that will automatically start the systems up and perform tests without an engineer physically starting the helicopter.

Memorable Events

The most memorable event on my summer internship actually took place in the longest meeting in my life. The meeting was a MH-65E Coast Guard Helicopter TRR (Test Readiness Review) and it is a three day meeting (8AM-4:30PM) where the team leads showed the Coast Guard customers what we will be testing for the next month. On the second day of the meeting, I was approached by one of the Coast Guard captain and I found out that around half of the Coast Guard serviceman and women were Embry-Riddle graduates. It was very surprising because it really showed me how big Riddle’s network really is. In addition to that, in the same meeting, I met another fine gentlemen who graduated from my high school back in the 70s with his Airframe & Powerplant licenses but he is a team lead for NavAir. During that simple exchange, I was really glad to be there because I feel like I belong there with all these alumni who really took their career into the next level.

Summaries and Lesson Learned

What I learned from this internship is the importance of team work and how learning in the real world differs from learning in a classroom. I was very eager to learn because everything was interesting to me and my colleagues have no trouble teaching me the many things that I don’t know. Some of my colleagues were part of the Black Hawk helicopter program back when it first came into production. I feel much reward to work with many engineers who had 20, 30 and even 40 years of experiences.

Due to the nature of my work and position, pictures and project samples were strictly classified and I am unable to share a lot of details due to confidentiality issues.

 

2013 Expo Success Story: Daniel Castrillo

Daniel Castrillo is currently a senior pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering at Embry-Riddle Daniel CastrilloAeronautical University and recently begin a co-op rotation with Gulfstream.

Below is his first-hand experience at the Industry/Career Expo 2013 held in Daytona Beach, FL.

I walked into the 2013 Career Expo week not expecting much; little did I know that by the time that week ended I would have set up my future with the world’s largest leading business aviation company. I had prepared weeks in advance for the events to come that week. In order to properly prepare myself, I attended as many of the Career Services events as my schedule allowed. Getting to know the Career Services staff is very helpful in preparing for the Career Expo due to their wealth in knowledge of obtaining a job at the career expo. Luckily for me, I had Sandi Ohman and Lisa Kollar as my UNIV 101 professors during my first semester at Riddle, and I will never forget how they inspired me to work hard for my dreams and obtain a co-op.

My first introduction to Gulfstream came in the fall of 2011 when they came on campus for the 2011 Career Expo, I immediately fell in love with the company and after sitting through their information session I decided to go up and talk to the Campus Relations Consultant, Cassie Batayias. After talking for a few minutes she invited me to interview with her and her team the next day. Although I could not receive an offer since I had just started as a freshman, it was an opportunity for me to network with some professional engineers and get familiar with Gulfstream’s interviewing process. The following fall of 2012 I applied for the Co-Op position with Gulfstream, I attended the Meet and Greet event they held on campus but mostly kept to myself and then attended the information session. I interviewed the next day with two of Gulfstream’s engineers for the position. Unfortunately I did not get the position and I was heartbroken. Being rejected from your dream job hurts and I almost didn’t bother applying the next year. Fortunately I decided not to give up on my dreams and applied again for the position the following year. I attended the Meet and Greet event that Gulfstream held in the Fall of 2013 and this time I tried to talk to everyone from Gulfstream that I could. I believe it is important to show them your face and engage them in an intelligent conversation so they can put your face to your name later on when they’re deciding who gets the job. I then attended the information session and stayed after to talk to Mrs. Batayias to once again introduce myself and converse with her.

The next day was the interview and I made sure to dress my absolute best. It is crucial to come into the interview with plenty of resumes, a list of intelligent questions to ask the interviewers, a notepad, and a pen. To help myself stand out from the other students being interviewed, I brought thank you cards but did not fill them out till after the interview. After the interview was over, I sat down in a chair and wrote out my thank you cards, placing personal thoughts and ideas that stemmed from the interview. Make sure to thank the person for interviewing you and try to sell yourself in the card by repeating your strengths and what you can bring to the table for them. After finishing with the interview, it was time to wait. I attended the Industry/Career Ex[p the next day and went up to the Gulfstream booth to show my face one last time so that they could remember me, I talked to a few more people and left. After 3 of the longest weeks of my life, I was called by Mrs. Batayias with an offer to take my talents to Gulfstream. It was honestly one of the happiest moments of my life because with the Co-Op position there is a 95% chance of obtaining a full-time position with Gulfstream as soon as I graduate.  Not only because of that but because of all the exciting work I will get to be doing here at Gulfstream.

Overall I recommend preparing weeks in advance before the career expo, and talking to and listening to what the career services staff has to say. It was Sandi Ohman’s idea to use the thank you cards and I honestly believe they played a big role in obtaining the position. The best thing you can do is to make yourself stand out from the rest of the competition by any means possible.

 

 

 

Researching Companies in Preparation for the Industry/Career Expo

By Lauren BurmesterResearching Companies

The Industry/Career Expo is approaching quickly.  Prescott’s Expo will be held on Thursday, October 2 and the Daytona Beach Expo will be held Wednesday, October 8th, giving you less than a month to prepare. Now is the time to start thinking about what to and how you will prepare for the expo. Below is a list of items you should be doing to prepare:

  • Prepare a resume
  • Review registered employers
  • Research companies
  • Prioritize who you want to see
  • Review your Skills and Strengths
  • Develop and rehearse an Elevator Pitch
  • Plan ahead what you will wear

One of the biggest complaints we receive from employers at expo is that students do not know anything about their company. If you anticipate speaking with employers at expo it is essential that you do research on the company ahead of time. A list of employers is available on EagleHire as well as in our new Embry-Riddle Career Fair Plus app available for free download on IPhone and Android phones. Each employer registered for the expo has a profile which will give a brief explanation of their company and what areas they are looking to recruit. This information will only give you a basic understanding of the company; however, it will assist with creating a target list of employers to speak with.

Once you have created your targeted list begin researching the companies to find out as much as possible about them. You can often learn about a company’s history, read annual reports/reviews, read about their culture, and their strategic plan through the internet. As you learn about the companies evaluate whether you feel you would be a “good fit” for their organization. You will learn a lot about yourself, your values, and your professional desires as you do this. Remember, not only are the employers there to see if you are a good fit, but you are there to see if they are a good fit for you as well.

There are multiple avenues to research a company, not just through the company’s website. Google a company or visit Glassdoor.com. You’ll find company reviews, ratings, salaries, CEO approval rating, competitors, content providers, and more company information. Use LinkedIn‘s companies section as a tool to find company information. Search by keyword or browse industry information. You’ll be able see your connections at the company, new hires, promotions, jobs posted, related companies, and company statistics.

Now that you have made your targeted list of companies and done research on them you will be comfortable and have the confidence to approach the recruiters. There will be a variety of HR Professionals, hiring managers, and recruiters at the expo. They are all there to promote their organization and find potential candidates for future jobs or internships. Like anywhere, you will notice many different personality styles as you approach different employer booths. Do not be intimidated and make assumptions about who you are approaching. Approach everyone with confidence, a smile, strong handshake and your Elevator Pitch so you can show them you are the right fit for their company.

Lauren Burmester is the Aviation Program Manager in Career Services.  She has been an employee with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University since 2006 working in Advising and Admissions.  She completed both her Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Studies with concentrations in Aviation Safety, Space Studies, and Business Administration, as well as a Master of Science degree in Aeronautics with a specialization in Safety Systems at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, graduating with distinction.  Lauren’s passion for the Aviation and Aerospace industry is instrumental in assisting students achieve their personal and professional goals.

Dressing for Success

By: Brian Carhide

professional dressIt is the beginning of the fall 2014 semester and the campuses are buzzing with excitement and Eagle Pride! Many of the seasoned students know that the fall semester is the time to dust off the suit and shine the shoes. On Thursday October 2, 2014 and Wednesday October 8, 2014, respectively, the Prescott and Daytona Beach campuses will be hosting their annual Industry/Career Expo. The events are professional dress events and to those who have experienced the Industry/Career Expo know that looking your best is essential to success.

If you are attending the Expo and whether you are seeking a job or just networking, we encourage professional dress to make that crucial first impression count. Dressing professionally not only shows an employer you mean business, but it exudes confidence. It lets the employer know that you are serious about being a part of their team. The aviation/aerospace industry expectations are that of basic colors, clean look, and conservative styles. Below are some general guidelines for both male and female expo dress:

Female

The Suit

  • Fabric: the best choice is 100% wool
  • A suit with a knee-length skirt and a tailored blouse is most appropriate
  • The most suitable colors include charcoal, medium gray, steel gray, black, and navy blue
  • Jackets should be simple, well-tailored and stylish, and fall just at the hips
  • Jackets should have smooth seams, even hemlines, correctly hanging linings, and well-sewn buttons

The Skirt

  • A skirt should fall just at or no more than 2” above the knee; stick with solid colors
  • A one-piece business dress with a matching jacket is popular

The Blouse

  • It is best to wear long sleeves; it projects an authoritative, professional look
  • Never wear a sleeveless blouse
  • Solid colors and natural fabrics are the best selections (particularly cotton and silk)
  • Acceptable colors include white and cream. Pale pink, soft yellow or light blue (only if it works with the overall look)
  • A classic softened collar works best with suits. The button-down collar should be worn when interviewing with a conservative company

The Shoes

  • They should preferably be leather
  • Colors; brown, black, navy, or burgundy
  • The color should always be the same as or a darker tone than your skirt
  • Flats are fine; a shoe with a heel of up to about 2 ½ “ is perfectly acceptable
  • The pump is the safest and most conservative look; a closed heel with a slightly open toe and the sling-back shoe with a closed toe are also acceptable

Male

The Suit

  • The most acceptable colors are navy through medium blue and black through charcoal
  • Fabric should be 100% wool. Why? Wool looks and wears better than any other material
  • Pinstripes are acceptable, so long as the stripes are very narrow and muted
  • A well-fitted two-piece suit is preferable; more refined, less showy
  • There should be no pull at the jacket shoulders, no gape at the back, and the cuffs should break at your wrists

The Shirt

  • Rule One: Always wear a long-sleeved shirt
  • Rule Two: Always wear a white, cream, or pale blue shirt
  • Rule Three: Never violate Rules One or Two
  • Remember, the paler and more subtle the shade, the better the impression you will make
  • Make sure your shirt fits properly; the collar should fit the neck properly

The Neckwear (Ties)

  • A pure silk tie makes the most powerful professional impact, has the best finish and feel, and is the easiest to tie
  • When tied, the tie should cover the belt buckle
  • Most appropriate knots are: Four-in-Hand, Windsor, and Half Windsor

The Shoes

  • They should either be black or brown
  • Lace-up wing tips are the most conservative choice and are most universally accepted

For additional resources on dress visit: http://careers.erau.edu/land-offer/interviewing/prepare/index.html

The career services office wants you to be successful, and if you do not have a suit or are not seeking a job or internship, we still encourage you to dress professionally. Please refrain from wearing items such as shorts, t-shirts, blue (or any other color) jeans, sandals, etc. (military and religious attire is acceptable). If you are not dressed in a suitable manner, you will be asked to change and return to the event. It is in your best interest to be dressed appropriately and save the shorts and flip flops for after the event.

Have a great semester and we look forward to seeing you in October at the Industry/Career Expo!

Brian Carhide has more than 20 years of professional aviation experience. He spent many years as a professional pilot, including experience as a charter and airline pilot. He has been a leader in guiding young aviators in higher education at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and is the Executive Director of Career Services.

The Prescott, AZ and Daytona Beach, FL Campuses Announce the Annual Industry/Career Expos

SAVE THE DATE! 

The Prescott, Arizona, campus will host their annual Industry/Career Expo on Thursday, October 2, 2014.  Information is available at http://prescott.erau.edu/campus-services/career/career-expo/industry-career-expo-prescott-campus.html.  Employers can register here

Prescott Expo - 2014

The Daytona Beach, Florida, campus will host their annual Industry/Career Expo on Wednesday, October 8, 2014.  General information is found at http://careers.erau.edu/events/industry-career-expo-daytona-beach.html, and information specific to students and alumni can be found here.  Employers can register for the event here

Blog image for DB Expo

Industry/Career Expo Success Story: John Lobdell

By John Lobdell

John is a First Year student in the Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering program at Embry-Riddle’s Daytona Beach campus

DSC_2692The Industry/Career Expo is one of the most publicized events on campus. Starting from the time you arrive in early fall, you are constantly reminded of it through e-mail, posters, teachers, and even certain organizations. And for good reason–some of the top aerospace companies in the world attend, looking for students to hire as interns or full-time employees. It’s an amazing opportunity–but one that is highly competitive, as hundreds of students are contending for the same positions. It’s really quite frightening to think about the odds of actually obtaining one of these positions; because of this, many students–especially freshmen–feel as though it’s pointless to even try. I was one of those freshmen for a while.

It didn’t take long from the time I arrived on campus to realize how big of an event the Expo was going to be, from all the advertising. Fairly early on, I knew that I wanted to attend, but actually getting an interview–much less a position–with one of these companies was far from my mind. I was a freshman after all, and freshmen don’t get internships. The idea of getting an internship for the summer after my freshman year didn’t even cross my mind until I actually met an upperclassman who had gotten one his freshman year. At first it was just a small thought; I figured it would be a great experience to get an internship my freshman year, but I also thought it highly unfeasible. Then I met several more upperclassman who had gotten internships their freshmen years, and I started to think that maybe it was possible.

At that point, the idea really started to sink in. Rather than just a thought, it became a goal. I realized how unfeasible it was, but I was determined to at least try. That way, even if I failed, I would still have a much better idea of what I needed to do for next year. But I really didn’t know what to expect at the Expo, and had no idea how I should prepare. I decided that the best thing would be to go to one of the Expo preparation sessions, hoping that it would give me at least an idea of what to expect. Little did I realize just how helpful one of these sessions would be. They went over everything from what to expect from the recruiters, to how to format your resume, to what to wear, and everything in between. By the time the Expo came, I had gone to several of the different sessions and was feeling quite prepared. And then, after weeks of waiting and preparation, it was time for the Industry/Career Expo.

On the day of the Expo, I was feeling quite confident. My resume had been polished several times over, I had a nice suit that looked professional, I knew exactly who I wanted to talk to, and I had a general idea what to expect from them. I arrived at the ICI Center, walked in, and suddenly… lost all confidence. How could I honestly have thought that I could get an internship? I hadn’t built up my resume nearly enough to be competitive. I began walking around, eying out the different companies. Finally, I got up the courage to go up to one. Figuring that I was ready, I decided to go to one of the companies that I had researched before the Expo. I got in line and waited until it was finally my turn to talk to one of the recruiters. I walked up, shook his hand, handed him my resume, and got so nervous I couldn’t remember what I was going to say. I mumbled and stuttered every time he asked me a question and am fairly sure that my words were not completely coherent. It was a disaster.

I felt pretty unconfident after I finished talking to that first recruiter. I lost all hope of getting an internship. I was just too nervous to be able to accurately display myself to recruiters. So I decided to just go to various companies and practice talking with them. I went to several companies, but although I was slowly growing more used to talking to the recruiters, I was still nervous, and it was obvious. Soon it came time for me to leave for my first class, so I decided that I would visit one more booth before I left. I had noticed General Electric‘s booth earlier in the day and decided that I would talk to them. As I began walking to the booth, I started to think about some advice that a friend of mine had given me before the Expo. “Be yourself,” he said.  So I decided to go up and talk to the recruiter not as a recruiter, but as a friend…someone I knew. When I got to the booth, I walked up to the recruiter and just had a normal conversation with him. By treating him as a friend, I was able to dispel the nervousness. He asked me a few questions about my resume, and at the end, he pointed to the top of my resume where my phone number was, and asked, “Is this where we can reach you?”

Later that day, I got a phone call asking if I could come in for an interview the following afternoon. I, of course, accepted. That night, I did as much research on GE as I could in order to prepare for the interview. I wanted to know exactly what to expect. Going into the interview the next day, I was prepared with not only as much information as possible, but also the same mindset that I had when I had talked to the recruiter the previous day. Treating the interviewer as just another person that I can have a normal conversation with helped once again calm my nerves and allow me to accurately represent myself. The interview went well, and I left feeling quite confident. And about a week later, I got the e-mail offering me a summer internship with GE.

It is not impossible for a freshman to get an internship, as I can attest to. If you want one, you will be able to get one; you just need to put in the effort. Many freshmen feel that they don’t have enough experience to get an internship, but the truth of the matter is that companies that hire freshmen interns realize that they won’t have experience. What these companies are looking for is not a vast amount of experience, but passion…passion about what you do and about what they do. And they are also looking for people who can just be themselves. So when you talk to either a recruiter or interviewer, just be yourself, and show off all of your skills and talents. Find a way to weave in what you’re passionate about, in particular if it has to do with the job position. When all you have to go with is a resume, it’s a little more difficult, but the same concept applies. Get involved with clubs and activities that correspond to your major or your desired career. Not only will these things provide invaluable experience, if you are truly passionate about your major, they will also be enjoyable. And having them on your resume will show that passion.

Finally, one of the keys to getting an internship is being prepared. Do your research on whatever companies you may be interested in. And take advantage of Career Services and all that it offers. The sessions on what to expect at the Expo were invaluable to me; I doubt I would have gotten the internship had I not gone to them. They tell you exactly what to expect, and they give you many useful tips to help you get an interview. Make sure your resume has been polished several times over as well; a poorly formatted resume can give a bad impression to recruiters and may keep you from getting the opportunity to express yourself more fully through an interview. I encourage everyone, especially freshmen, to aim for an internship because as long as you are willing to put in the effort, there is nothing stopping you from obtaining one.

Tell Me More! Employers Give Feedback after the Industry/Career Expo

The Daytona Beach Career Services Office asked employers at the Daytona Beach Industry/Career Expo to provide us with specific advice that we could share with students and alumni. Many were happy to share their insights and words of wisdom, which we provided below.

IMG_0570Do not feel limited to your field of study.
-AeroTurbine

Situational awareness in the media and current events – look at how they influence the company and affect the company strategy.
-Boeing

If interested in the company, set up and use the Boeing jobs website.
-Boeing

Use Career Services.
-Boeing

Don’t be afraid of [exploring] lesser known companies.
-Cobham

Work hard to maintain a strong GPA.  Get involved in extra-curricular activities and community service.
-Compass Airlines

Study interview questions prior to coming [to the Expo] and research our company.  Have a few goals/positions that you are interested in, even if it’s not currently being offered.  It shows you have focus and a plan in mind for your future.  Also, write a bit about your interests outside of work/school – we are looking to hire people and want to get to know you!
-Flight Options/Nextant Aerospace

IMG_0206Get out-of-classroom technical and leadership opportunities.
-GE Aviation

Community and project involvement are very important, but don’t let it affect your GPA.
-GE Aviation

ERAU graduates have good design experience with CATIA, but they need to learn more manufacturing items, specifically metal stamping, plastic injection molding and casting.
-Goken America

More than one page resumes please.  One page resumes are not enough for engineering resumes.
-Goken America

Know more about the company with whom you are talking.
-jetBlue

Do internships.
-Lee County Port Authority

One page resumes!
-Northrop Grumman

Very pleased with turnout and professionalism.
-PSA Airlines

Students should be prepared to respond clearly about their career aspirations/objectives and must be in a position to validate how they will apply their education to meet their career objectives.
-Ramco Systems Corporation

IMG_0105Keep trying.  International students, don’t be upset over sponsorship issues.  There are companies out there who are just right for you.
-Spirit Airlines

Stay strong!  It is all worth it in the end.
-Spirit Airlines

Keep your GPA up; take advantage of the easy first and second year classes.  Get involved with out-of class projects and be a leader.
-Teledyne Oil & Gas

Highlight report writing abilities on resumes.  Seems like many students are unaware of report writing requirements of engineering.
-Teledyne Oil & Gas

GPA does matter.  When looking for a full-time position fresh out of school, internships or work experience are critical.
-TASC

Be informed about the companies in which you are interested.
-TASC

Be open to systems engineering and program management support contractor roles.
-TASC

Listen to ERAU Career Services staff advice.  Have self-confidence and don’t give up.
-United Airlines

We look for talented and bright individuals that can communicate effectively.  One student actually said he just wanted to get his foot in the door and stay one year, so he could get another job – Big NO!
-Universal Avionics Systems Corporation

IMG_0625Valuable feedback from employers about students and alumni includes the following insights.

  • Be aware that many employers use online application systems
  • Be open to other opportunities; some experience in industry is better than none
  • Be prepared and communicate experiences to industry professionals
  • Be prepared with resume in hand and knowledge about company
  • Do a bit more company research
  • Don’t ask about the company; some homework needs to be done prior to the Expo
  • Dress appropriately [i.e. professionally]
  • Everyone should be prepared, even first year students
  • Follow-up with companies throughout the year
  • Personalize resumes for specific companies
  • Prepare, prepare, prepare!
  • Research company websites for available opportunities before approaching employers
  • Strong communication skills needed to talk to potential employers; no eye contact is a negative factor
  • Want to see professional, prepared and interested students

IMG_0575Students and alumni received some positive feedback from employers, and here are areas on which employers complimented you.

  • Enthusiastic and prepared for working in airline/aviation industry
  • Good quality
  • Motivation
  • Polished
  • Preparation
  • Professional appearance and dress
  • Professionalism
  • Quality
  • Well spoken

Industry/Career Expo TODAY, October 9 – Daytona Beach, FL Campus

Embry-Riddle students and alumni, the Industry/Career Expo is today, Wednesday, October 9 in the ICI Center from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

Industry/Career Expo

Industry/Career Expo

Approaching employers

Approaching employers

Professional or business casual attire will be required for entrance. Students and alumni not dressed appropriately will be turned away at the door. Military uniforms, flight instructor/pilot uniforms and religious attire are acceptable.

Professional dress at the Industry/Career Expo

Professional dress at the Industry/Career Expo

Companies Attending Tomorrow’s ERAU Industry/Career Expo in Daytona Beach, FL

er013The Daytona Beach Industry/Career Expo is tomorrow, Wednesday, October 9!

Industry/Career Expo: Wednesday, October 9 in the ICI Center from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

See below for a list of the employers who will be in attendance, collecting resumes and/or speaking with candidates regarding full-time and co-op/internship positions. Click on the company’s link to visit the website to learn more about the employer and specific career opportunities that are available.

Can’t make it to the Industry/Career Expo in Daytona Beach? Apply directly to positions of interest on the company websites of those attending. Embry-Riddle students and alumni, you can also publish your resume to the many resume books in the EagleHire Network to get your resume to recruiters who are linked in the system.

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