Alumni Spotlight: Rick Uskert

Richard Uskert 2x3_6367Rick Uskert graduated from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach in 1996 with a degree in Aircraft Engineering Technology.  He is currently a Senior Engineer at Textron Systems Unmanned Systems.

What has been your career path since graduating from Embry-Riddle?

My career started during one of the slumps in the aerospace industry and I took a job with a company in NW Indiana designing industrial equipment. After a few months, I interviewed with a consulting engineering firm in the Chicago suburbs which providing structural and fatigue fracture analysis to the aviation industry, both commercial and military. The guys I worked for and with were brilliant, having written fatigue analysis and damage tolerance of structures content for several publications; however, I as a more creative person at heart – and still am – so post-damage analysis wasn’t a path I wished to pursue.

The next five years were spent working in the medical industry, designing instruments for minimally invasive open heart surgery, stents, airway management and many other products. As the company manufactured product for many of the big companies, such as Abbott, CTI and Stryker, I touched many products which were mainstays of the operating room and in-home care products during the 1990’s and 2000’s.

From there I turned back to aviation and, while working at Pratt & Whitney, furthered my education and career through a Master’s degree in Management and New Product Development at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Hartford, CT. During my time at P&W, I worked with a great team in the Compression Systems Module Center (CSMC) designing and analyzing composite components for the F119 and F135 engines which power the F-22 and F-35 aircraft.

My next hop was to Rolls-Royce in Indianapolis to design Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) components for the hot section of advanced technology gas turbine engines. The composite technologies used between the front end of the P&W and the back end of the RR engines couldn’t be more dissimilar and each had their quirks and limitations which needed to be accounted for in the product designs, which made each task challenging. Working at the leading edge of ceramic matrix composite technology application has led to a number of patent applications for our team.

Currently, I work for Textron Systems Unmanned Systems, formerly AAI, in Maryland as a Sr. Aero/Mech Engineer, responsible for managing project tasking and the associated resources to integrate new product onto the legacy Shadow UAVs, increase capabilities through airframe upgrades and provide product designs to future systems.

You have worked in a variety of fields, what lessons have you gained from varied experiences?

The first lesson I learned was engineering is engineering and the fundamentals are the same. Designing a product to save someone’s life in the operating room is not much different than designing one to protect a soldier’s life on the battlefield. Each project starts with requirements, progresses through material selection, design analysis and manufacturing. I’m simplifying here, but the fundamentals are the same; one only needs a willingness to learn the differences in materials and how best use them in each application.

With each employment change, I have been able to draw upon knowledge I gained from past experiences, all the way back to the beginning of my career, even though it has been based upon dissimilar products and/or industries.

I have also learned what I enjoyed the most, and personally that is working in a small company environment. Those companies are the most dynamic and they offer opportunities to act in multiple roles and to get one’s hands dirty building product. That has been most enjoyable for me.

I have worked with a number of great, experienced teams; resulting in products which have helped many people continue their own lives and professions. Because of this, I do not look for a greatest accomplishment in my career, as I associate that with an object and I tend to be more of an experience type of person. That being said, I have considered meeting soldiers who have stated that our products have been responsible for their safe return from the field as well as people which have used the medical products I helped develop as highlights to my career. Those instances act as reminders as to why I choose to work on these products.

What advice do you have for graduating students to be successful in the job search?

Everyone is encouraged to research the company and the job they are considering applying for as best as they can. Many times a job posting is very general, especially for entry level positions, so one should understand the type of products that company and/or division develops. Make sure that is what you want to work on and tailor your experiences to that company. It takes time and effort; however, it allows you to stand out as a candidate.

All companies are interested in understanding what you have accomplished individually and as a team member. Include two or three examples of this information on your resume in a concise manner. If you are invited for an interview, be excited about being there and confident in presenting your product: yourself. During the interview process, we are judging your personality and how well you may fit with those already established on the team in addition to your technical ability.

Finally, look for opportunities that may not be the vision of your dream job, as one does not fall into that position upon walking off campus. These other experiences open doors in the future, allowing you to set a path towards that end goal, as it changes over your career.

 

Advertisements

Co-op/Intern Spotlight: Mark Payne

Mark PayneMark Payne is an Aerospace Engineering student at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach.  He transferred to Riddle in spring 2014 in order to study Aerospace Engineering.  Although he is fascinated by planes, the reality is that he grew up in a ship yard.  His father owns San Juan Towing & Marine Services, which specialized in commercial vessel repair and small scale towing.

How did you land the internship and how did you navigate the process?

Landing an internship for the summer was nearly impossible. The reality was that my GPA was just below the required GPA for most employers and I would usually be cut off because of that. After several months of constantly applying to most major companies, and calling many smaller companies, I had not heard any responses.

By late April, I was worried for obvious reasons. The idea of applying to as many as thirty internships and not even landing one interview was not very motivating. My father actually mentioned the fact that I should diversify. That is when I decided to look for a company which was not related to the aerospace industry. I found the International Ship Repair & Marine Services in Tampa. In order to “land the internship”, I scheduled a meeting with the company Vice President two days after finals had finished and was working the very next Monday.

What experience have you had and what did you do on your internship?

My experience was definitely unique. I had the opportunity to be rotated between three different departments. These were the machinist department, the quality assurance department, and the estimating department.

As a machinist, I was out in the field with the workers. I was able to obtain real exposure and got hands on shipyard experience. I was also able to learn how to use manufacturing equipment such as lathes and milling machines.

While working in the quality assurance department I was responsible for the visual inspection of drive shafts and propeller blades that were both coming in and out of the machine shop.

Working with the estimating department was my favorite. I was given the tasks of designing engine mounts for three ton diesel engines and a propeller stand which could hold a five ton propeller.

What advice would you give students who are contemplating doing an internship experience?

I would tell students to pursue any and every opportunity possible. Not only will they gain valuable experience which will make them better engineers and more hire able, but they will also, in most cases, be able to obtain engineering tech elective credit in an engineering student.

Talk about your learning experience both professionally and personally.

While interning, although my schedule varied, I was working 40 hours per week. While working with the machinist and job estimating departments, I had a 7:25AM to 3:55PM work schedule. While working for the quality assurance department, I was working by 6:00 and out by 2:30PM. I had a 1/2 lunch break.

Besides interning, I was also taking two of ERAU’s online classes. I was able to both work full time and take two classes. This was definitely a very big plus.

Would you do a second internship? Why? 

I have already begun applying for many internships. I believe that while one internship is definitely necessary, having two internships is even better.

What are the benefits you will take away from doing the internship when looking for a full-time career?

When looking for a full time career I will have the benefit of having prior work experience. This is extremely valuable in a very competitive job market. Having prior work experience is a very big plus.

Any other general advice to share?

As for advice, I have to emphasize that there is nothing more important than constantly applying to internships. If you’ve applied for twenty positions and think that you are done, think again and apply for twenty more. In my case, I was able to land an internship on my last attempt.

If you are unable to land an internship because of grades, take summer courses, either on campus or online. By doing so, you will improve your GPA and have a better chance of being hired when applying for future internships.

 

 

 

 

 

Alumni Spotlight: Kevin MacLean

Kevin McLeanKevin MacLean is a May 2001 graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach.  He completed his Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Science and is currently a helicopter pilot for NextEra Energy.

What does your current role with NextEra Energy entail? 

Since 2006, I have been flying helicopters and jets for an outfit in Palm Beach, Florida called NextEra Energy. This Part 91 flight department has 2 Agusta helicopters, 2 Citation XLs, 2 Falcon 2000s, and 11 pilots.  The helicopters usually fly all over Florida and into the Keys, while the jets cover the entire North America, Caribbean and occasionally Europe.

Landing at a flight department like this was a career goal of mine. I fly the line and am also a Training Captain on the helicopters.I assist with new hire, recurrent, and instrument training. Interestingly enough, my dad is actually the one who first told me about NextEra’s flight department, having been and  engineer working with the company for over 40 years.

How did you make the initial transition from fixed wing to rotor?

My transition from fixed-wing to helicopters occurred six months after starting my initial fixed-wing flight training. Thankfully, my comrade Hugh, connected me with his good friend Josh, who was chief pilot for a helicopter company at KFXE in South Florida. Josh recruited me as an intern, where I quickly earned my helicopter ratings. In the year 2000, I was an ERAU student with a helicopter in Daytona. This served as my time-building flying job senior year and beyond graduation.

Based on your experience, what are the advantages of working in corporate aviation?

In my experience, corporate aviation is a real blessing. Each outfit I have had the pleasure to fly with has been like a small family with a very personal feel. It usually is a fairly low stress environment. Corporate aviation’s goal is to be safe, flexible, convenient, and comfortable. We often have very sophisticated equipment and there also tends to be a variety of destinations.

What personal attributes do you feel help to make one successful in the corporate aviation environment?

A good attribute for success in corporate aviation is flexibility. These groups are small, relying on the limited staff to do a variety of tasks.  A positive attitude goes a very long way. The flight crew is faced with new challenges best handled by the problem-solving personalities. Another valuable tool is the ability to work well with others, because everyone wants to be around quality people.
What advice do you have for current and future pilots seeking work in corporate aviation?

Emphasis on networking is huge advice for pilots seeking work in corporate aviation. Networking starts in flight school and continues beyond the time you actually find the job you are looking for. I personally have flown for over a half-dozen different corporate outfits, and each one of these opportunities became real due to networking. Stay in contact with your peers, and make new contacts: classmates, coworkers, social media, job fairs, internet research, and other methods.  Remain professional as you network and prepare for a flood of success.

Identifying companies that will be the right fit for you!

By: Sally Richards

Spend some quality time using a variety of resources searching for companies and researching those companies forsearch companies potential career employment. It is important to determine which company is right for you and if you are right for that company. Searching and researching go hand in hand.

You may already have a group of companies you are familiar with that you think are your targeted companies…but what about the other thousands of companies, contractors, agencies and organizations that you aren’t familiar with and may have overlooked?

Many job seekers tend to want a list of prospective employers, but that doesn’t address an individual’s preferences, goals, interests, experiences, background or desires. Based on your academic degree and passion, determine the general industry or focus that fits your education or your ideals and desires.

So, where can you begin to search for and research companies?

Take advantage of Embry-Riddle’s Career Services resources for your initial landing site.

  • Embry-Riddle Career Services website: http://careers.erau.edu/
    • Useful Links (Links to 100s of corporate websites, government agency websites, specific population websites, job search engines)
  • EagleHire via Ernie (Research potential employers)
  • Company presentations on-campus (Learn about companies directly from company representatives)
  • Career Services Organization on Bb > External Links
    • Career Shift (Company information and contacts from a compilation of job boards)
    • Going Global (Corporate profiles for worldwide companies in various industries)
    • AWIN, Aviation Week Intelligence Network including the World Aviation Directory also called the WAD (Utilized to conduct company research)
  • Embry-Riddle Hunt Memorial Library
    • Hoover’s – ProQuest Central online database/Publications Search for Hoover’s (Company information)
    • Business Insights: Essentials online database (Business profiles)
    • Business Source Complete online database (Business profiles)
    • AWIN -Aviation Week Intelligence Network including World Aviation Directory online database called the WAD (Utilized to conduct company research)
  • Corporate Company websites
  • Government Agency websites
  • Networking, contacts and connections
  • Social Media (LinkedIn-professional networking; Facebook; Twitter; Pinterest; Instagram)
  • Google searches on companies
  • Magazine articles
  • Trade Publications (Employers industry activity; contributions related to their field and organization)
  • Professional Associations (See how employers contribute to the profession)
  • Advertisements (Marketing information may be a key to how successful a company is in business)
  • Conferences (Opportunities to talk with company representatives attending professional conferences)
  • Faculty (Connections to industry from research and prior careers)
  • Databases (Targeted business profiles and information)
    • Dun & Bradstreet

Now that you know where to search for companies and view their profiles, you’ll be able to decide with confidence whether the company culture, growth, strategies, goals, policies, values, and mission of the company align with your current and future expectations. Discovering additional companies outside your initial handful expands your employment potential and opportunity for success.

Once you’ve searched, researched, and concluded a company is right for you, hence, earn your paycheck from, you’ll still have to apply, interview and be selected for a position. Remember, it is 100% your choice to apply to companies in which you have an interest and it is also 100% your choice whether you accept a company or organization’s offer of employment. Your choice will be based on an educated decision!

Sally Richards has 30 years of experience in higher education with a proven track record in Career Services. Sally started her career with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Aeronautical Engineering Department.  Currently as the Career Services Cooperative Education/Internship Program Manager, she manages and facilitates operations of the Co-op/Intern Program for the team of Program Managers and ensures adherence of Co-op policies and procedures while overseeing conflict resolution for co-op situations. Her credentials include aviation/airline industry experience in flight recruiting, maintenance planning and passenger service with two major airlines and one regional carrier, as well as studies at Kent State University in Ohio.

Alumni Spotlight: Deric S. Dymerski

Deric S. Dymerski is a December 1990 graduate from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach.  His Deric Dymeskydegree was in Aeronautical Science and he is currently President of Atlas Aviation.

Can you please discuss your career path since graduating from Embry-Riddle?

I started at the customer service desk for Butler Aviation at Palm Beach International Airport (PBI), and went through the merger that formed Signature Flight Support.  After a couple months, I was promoted to Operations Supervisor, and eventually Airlines Supervisor (mostly for a UPS freight and cargo operation).  After a few years, I took a job as General Manager for Hawthorne Aviation (which became Piedmont-Hawthorne and is now Landmark Aviation) at Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport (KLAL).  There, I was promoted to Regional Manager and covered four FBOs in Florida, two in Georgia and two in North Carolina.  After several years in the position, I left to form my own company and find an airport suitable for my own FBO plan.

After a year of doing some FBO consulting, my new company (Atlas Aviation) won the RFP for FBO services at Peter O. Knight Airport (KTPF) in Tampa, Florida.  We’ve now been here just over 10 years, and have a busy Part 61 and Part 141 flight school (Cessna Pilot Center), a full aircraft maintenance shop (Cessna Single Engine Service Center) and the full ground services of tiedown, hangar storage and aviation fuels.  We have hosted AOPA Expo and AOPA Summit at our airport, and continue to host several, large special events each year.  We have recently expanded into aircraft painting, and plan on a full avionics shop next.

Why is involvement in organizations outside the workplace important? 

I have been a member and attended the Annual Meeting of the Florida Aviation Trades Association for nearly 20 years. A few years into it, I was nominated to the Board of Directors, and learned a TON from the people I met and still call friends.  When it came time to start my own company, each service or vendor I needed came from my contacts within the organization; what an incredible support network for an independent company!  Once settled into Atlas, I rejoined the Board and am currently serving as President (we’ve changed our name to the Florida Aviation Business Association www.FABA.Aero).  Meeting and communicating regularly with other industry professionals (ERAU has a seat on the Board) is an incredible resource for running a business.

What has been your greatest achievement in your career?

Having come from a background of larger, “chain” type FBOs, I was warned by many that you couldn’t make a living selling Avgas, and certainly not with a flight school or even maintenance.  Many had the “gas and grass” mentality, and subbed out all the other services and just collected rent.  We now have a proven business model of teaching people to fly, then supporting our other departments by servicing the airplanes the new pilots ultimately buy (some simply continue to rent from our fleet, of course).  We have several tenants on their second or third aircraft upgrade since we taught them to fly.  We have made the “against the odds” business model work by hiring exceptional people and cultivating a professional yet fun atmosphere at the airport.

What advice do you have for current and/or graduating students to make them competitive in today’s workplace?

We’ve always appreciated ERAU grads and have several working for us.  More than education or experience (though both are factors), we look for a great ATTITUDE in an employee.  You should be willing to learn as you go, have a smile on your face and have an honest desire to help customers.  That will make both your career and the company for whom you work successful; I love what I do!

 

Advantages of Job Shadowing

By: Sandi OhmanJob Shadowing

What is job shadowing? As the name implies job shadowing is the process of following, like a shadow, another person in a specific job or career position/field/industry. For someone who is looking to find out about a specific career path, this is an excellent opportunity to see what the job is like over a short period of time. This activity can typically last a few hours, a day, or a week. Job shadowing is encouraged for middle and high-school aged students, as they learn about different career paths. However it is not just for this group, as college students, and people looking to switch careers could find this activity very useful. Job shadowing is also an extension of informational interviewing http://careers.erau.edu/land-offer/interviewing/informational-interviewing/index.html

The obvious advantage of job shadowing is that it allows a person to learn about specific career paths, as mentioned above. Learning about skills needed for specific careers is another advantage of job shadowing. An additional advantage is being able to learn more about a specific company and its culture. This could help determine if this is a company they really want to work for in the future. While this can be hard to determine in a few hours or even days, it is still a good view into possible career fields, which can promote further questions, research, and/or evaluation.

Where should someone start the search for job shadowing opportunities?

  • Check the Career Services Office for connections in the career area of interest. Many times they work with alumni in a specific career area of interest as well as companies that typically recruit specific career areas.
  • Local companies that offer careers in the area(s) of interest
  • If a current student or an alumnus, ask faculty who teach in the areas of interest if they would recommend a contact
  • Personal network – people know people in all areas of careers. Don’t underestimate connections!
  • Professional organizations could offer excellent connections for job shadowing opportunities – conferences, events, membership directories or other members

For more detailed information regarding Job Shadowing, check out the Quintessential Careers blog, Research Companies and Careers Through Job Shadowing (http://www.quintcareers.com/job_shadowing.html)

Sandi Ohman is the Senior Program Manager in the Career Services Office at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  She has been with the university for over 9 years and has advised students in most all degree areas while in Career Services.  Sandi brings additional experience having worked in the finance industry for over 6 years in her previous career.  She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from the University of Florida, and her Master of Arts degree in Educational Leadership from the University of Central Florida.

The Daytona Beach Industry/Career Expo is TODAY, October 8!

Embry-Riddle students and alumni, the Industry/Career Expo is today, Wednesday, October 8 in the ICI Center from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

LinkedHeroImage (1) (2)

Professional or business casual attire will be required for entrance. Students and alumni not dressed appropriately will be turned away at the door. Military uniforms, flight instructor/pilot uniforms and religious attire are acceptable.

IMG_7753

Example of Professional Dress

The Prescott, AZ’s Industry/Career Expo is TODAY, October 2!

The Prescott, AZ Industry/Career Expo is today, Thursday, October 2 from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm in the Activity Center.

Prescott Expo - 2014

Below is a list of companies attending Prescott’s Industry/Career Expo Today!

2013 Expo Success Story: Chao Zheng

Chao W. Zheng is an Aerospace Engineering major at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Daytona Beach and just Chaofinished a summer internship with Rockwell Collins.

Below is his first-hand experience at the Industry/Career Expo 2013 held in Daytona Beach, FL.

My name is Chao Zheng and I am currently a junior majoring in Aerospace Engineering with a minor in Business Administration at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Over the summer of 2014, I was hired by Rockwell Collins as a Systems Engineer intern working in the Coast Guard & VIP Rotary Platform team. During my time there, I worked on two programs: 1) VH-60N/3D Presidential Helicopter “Marine One” and 2) MH-65E Coast Guard Helicopter “Dolphin”.

During the Embry-Riddle industry career expo, I checked out numerous companies but didn’t have any luck with any of the companies despite going through interviews. During that semester, I was waiting for a Boeing internship offer so I didn’t apply to a lot of other companies. When the spring semester came by, I told myself that I shouldn’t limit my options. That’s when I saw an email about Rockwell Collins coming on campus and they are looking for summer interns and co-ops.

Getting Hired

I first heard about Rockwell Collins through my high school’s Airframe & Powerplant training with their radio systems. Immediately, I went online and did some research about the company and was really impressed by the ethical working environment. So, I brushed up my resume from my COM 219 Tech writing class, went to the Rockwell Collins meet & greet and immediately got another interview offer the next day. At that time, I didn’t keep my hopes high because a lot of the applicants were seniors or graduates so as a sophomore, I feel like I didn’t stand out. So about one month went by, and I got an email from the Rockwell recruiter saying that I am one of their top candidates and requested to have an online interview with a team manager. Little did I know, my manager Matt Mulnik was the head of the Coast Guard & Presidential Helicopter team and one week after my interview with him-I was officially hired.

What I did as an Intern

As an Intern with Rockwell Collins, I was working on two Government Systems program under the rotary wings department. Throughout my 11 weeks internship, I spend about 70% of my time with the Presidential helicopter program and about 30% with the Coast Guard program. As a Systems Engineer, I was working with a couple of test leads performing testing on the helicopter’s avionics systems. Some of the test include: Terrain Awareness Warning System (TAWS), Communication, GPS, Map updates, Radio frequencies, CSFIR (black box), engine simulations, overload systems test and quite a few classified tests. In addition to testing, I learned how to script programs using python that will automatically start the systems up and perform tests without an engineer physically starting the helicopter.

Memorable Events

The most memorable event on my summer internship actually took place in the longest meeting in my life. The meeting was a MH-65E Coast Guard Helicopter TRR (Test Readiness Review) and it is a three day meeting (8AM-4:30PM) where the team leads showed the Coast Guard customers what we will be testing for the next month. On the second day of the meeting, I was approached by one of the Coast Guard captain and I found out that around half of the Coast Guard serviceman and women were Embry-Riddle graduates. It was very surprising because it really showed me how big Riddle’s network really is. In addition to that, in the same meeting, I met another fine gentlemen who graduated from my high school back in the 70s with his Airframe & Powerplant licenses but he is a team lead for NavAir. During that simple exchange, I was really glad to be there because I feel like I belong there with all these alumni who really took their career into the next level.

Summaries and Lesson Learned

What I learned from this internship is the importance of team work and how learning in the real world differs from learning in a classroom. I was very eager to learn because everything was interesting to me and my colleagues have no trouble teaching me the many things that I don’t know. Some of my colleagues were part of the Black Hawk helicopter program back when it first came into production. I feel much reward to work with many engineers who had 20, 30 and even 40 years of experiences.

Due to the nature of my work and position, pictures and project samples were strictly classified and I am unable to share a lot of details due to confidentiality issues.

 

Brace Yourself… It’s Going to Be a Bumpy Job Search

By: Emily Ferraro

No one said it would be easy, right? All of the tailored resumes, cover letters, applications, and emails pile up and you quickly find yourself in a human resource nightmare if you’ve jumped in without preparing yourself for what to expect. But that doesn’t mean that you need to suffer silently feeling overwhelmed and/or wondering why you haven’t made any progress in your job search. This is a daunting process for anyone whether you are just starting your first employment journey or find yourself making a transition in your career. A lot of people express that applying for jobs is a full-time job but they leave it at that, without discussing positive ways to cope through good times and hard times when looking for employment.Prepare Sign

 

Here are some “mind”ful tips in preparation for your impending job search:

  1. Set Reasonable Goals and Expectations
    • Securing a job before graduation often means that you must do some soul searching. Employers want well rounded candidates who are able to make decisions, solve problems, and communicate their ideas. Try thinking about your job search as one big problem that needs solving, use your decision making skills to help you navigate and remember to clearly communicate your ideas along the way. The best way to start communicating clearly is by starting the conversation within yourself- be proactive and start to create goals and outline your job search. Stick to them without comparing yourself to your peers/colleagues. This is YOUR job search and you have unique qualities that can’t be compared to others. Goals can be as simple as setting a number of applications to complete within each week. Or choosing a day of the week to refresh and stay up-to-date on your follow-up communication. This will help reinforce your expectations for yourself and will help you from feeling overwhelmed.
  2. Find your outlet
    • It’s easy to get distracted from doing what you enjoy when you are so worried about securing a job. It’s very important that you find something you love to do that helps you relieve stress. Remind yourself to take a break and go for a walk, or read a couple of chapters from your favorite book, maybe even watching your favorite movie at the end of the night or sneaking in a couple episodes of Game of Thrones. Whatever it is that you enjoy, this small treat should be your way of re-charging before you jump back into the process. Learning your personal coping method is very important so you do not start turning to bad habits when things get rough and ultimately risk putting off your goals.
  3. Turn to your mentor
    • My most cherished advisor once said, “There is nothing lonelier than going through a job search alone” and he was right. Don’t ever let yourself feel like you are alone when there are so many people around you who can serve as a mentor. Focus on your network and find one or two mentors that you can turn to when you find the search is getting to you or when you need help solving problems and making decisions. A good mentor should be able to challenge and support you while giving feedback and advice that encourage you to move forward even when times are hard. Look to your existing network on-campus, in your community, and in friends who have already secured jobs. Your Career Services Program Managers are another great mentor network!
  4. Keep your head up
    • It’s not always easy to stay positive when you feel like you’ve hit a wall in the job search. Especially when you haven’t heard back from companies or start feeling the pain of rejection. Remember to keep in touch with family and friends and tell people what you are going through, otherwise no one will know what you are going through. Lastly, keep these tips in mind and think of ways to recharge yourself when you aren’t feeling motivated. It’s normal to feel set-back but you have to get back up and try again.

coffee cup

Emily Ferraro serves as the Program Manager for undergraduate Aerospace Engineering students. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies as well as her Master of Education in Curriculum & Instruction specializing in College Student Affairs at the University of South Florida in Tampa, FL. Emily enjoys working with students on topics such as personal branding and social media and tailoring job search documents.

%d bloggers like this: